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Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
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Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012

The 2012 Republican presidential primaries are the selection processes in which voters of the Republican Party will choose their nominee for President of the United States in the 2012 presidential election. There will be 2,286 delegates chosen,[1] and a candidate must accumulate 1,144 delegate votes at the Republican National Convention to win the nomination.[2] The primaries and caucuses can be binding or nonbinding in allocating delegates to the repective state delegations to the National convention. But the actual election of the delegates are many times at a later date. Delegates are elected in different ways that varies from state to state. They can be elected at local conventions, selected from slates submitted by the candidates, Selected at committee meetings or elected directly at the caucuses and primaries. Until the delegates are actually elected the delegate numbers are by nature projections, but it is only in the nonbinding caucus states where they are not allocated at the primary or caucus date.

The primary contest began in 2011 with a fairly wide field. Mitt Romney, former Governor of Massachusetts, had been preparing to run for president ever since the 2008 election [3] and the media narrative became: "Who will be the anti-Romney candidate?"[4] One after another, several candidates rose in the polls throughout the year. However, the field was down to four candidates by March 2012: Former House speaker Newt Gingrich, U.S. Congressman Ron Paul, former Governor Mitt Romney and former U.S. Senator Rick Santorum. It is the first presidential primary to be affected by a Supreme Court ruling that allowed unlimited fundraising for candidates through super PACs.

For the first time in modern GOP primary history, three different candidates won the first three contests. Santorum, who had been running a one-state campaign in Iowa, narrowly winning in that state's caucuses with a handful of votes over Romney (who was thought to have won the caucuses before a recount). Romney went on to win New Hampshire, but lost South Carolina to Gingrich. From there, Santorum took his campaign national and carried three more states before Super Tuesday, while Romney carried seven.

Super Tuesday primaries took place on March 6. With ten states voting and 419 delegates being allocated, it had only about half the potential impact of its 2008 predecessor. Romney carried six states and Santorum three states, while Gingrich won his home state of Georgia. Throughout the rest of March, 266 delegates were allocated in 12 events, including all of the territorial contests and the first local conventions that allocated delegates (Wyoming's county conventions). Santorum won Kansas and three Southern primaries, but was unable to make any significant gains on Romney, who remained the frontrunner after securing more than half of the delegates allocated in March.

Contents


The state of the primaries

The state of the primaries
Candidates: Newt
Gingrich
Ron
Paul
Mitt
Romney
Rick
Santorum
Uncom.
Delegates won 135
(16%)
34
(4%)
477
(56%)
205
(24%)
8
Popular vote 2,212,001
(22%)
1,079,753
(10%)
4,127,917
(40%)
2,850,546
(28%)
States and Territories won 2 0 18 7
Districts won (Delegate awarding only) 20 1 61 39

  • "Delegates won" are those committed to the candidate, supporters elected as unbound delegates at their local conventions are counted but unbound RNC delegates are not.
  • "Popular vote" only includes votes cast for the four candidates.[5]
  • "States/Territories and Districts won" are according to delegates, popular vote is only used if two or more candidates have the same number of elected delegates.[6]
  • No state, territory or district is counted twice as a win in the tables of the timeline section. For the nonbinding caucus states it is the candidate reciving most at-large delegates at the state convention that are counted as the winner.

Delegate Count

Candidate Current office Home state Bound
Pledged Delegates
[7]
Unbound
Elected
Delegates
Unbound
RNC
Superdelegates
[8]
Projected
Delegates
[9]
Popular vote[5]

x100px

Mitt
Romney
Former Governor Massachusetts
464
13
32
563
4,127,915
(40.2%)

x100px

Rick
Santorum
Former U.S. Senator Pennsylvania
205
0
2
262
2,850,541
(27.8%)

x100px

Newt
Gingrich
Former U.S. House Speaker Georgia
135
0
2
155
2,212,001
(21.5%)

x100px

Ron
Paul
U.S. Representative Texas
34
0
1
78
1,079,751
(10.5%)
(Unassigned:) 1,111 204 83 1,228

States Carried

Candidate States first place States second place States third place

x100px

Mitt
Romney
16
Alaska, Arizona, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, Ohio, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Wyoming
Territories: American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico
9
Colorado, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee
Territories: U.S. Virgin Islands
4
Alabama, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Dakota

x100px

Rick
Santorum
11
Alabama, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Tennessee
9
Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, Ohio, Wyoming
Territories: Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico
6
Florida, Georgia, Maine, South Carolina, Vermont, Washington
Territories: U.S. Virgin Islands

x100px

Newt
Gingrich
2
Georgia, South Carolina
4
Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Nevada
7
Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee

x100px

Ron
Paul
0
Territories: U.S. Virgin Islands
7
Maine, Minnesota, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Vermont, Virginia, Washington
10
Alaska, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, Wyoming
Territories: Northern Mariana Islands

Counties Carried

2012 Republican primary results by county

Timeline of the race

The primary contest takes place from January 3 to July 14 and will allocate and elect 2,286 voting delegates to the 2012 Republican National Convention in the week of August 27. To become the Republican Party's nominee for the 2012 presidential election a candidate needs a majority of 1,144 delegates to vote for him. The 2012 race is significantly different from earlier races. Many states have switched from their old winner-take-all allocation to proportional allocation. Many remaining winner-take-all states are allocating delegates to both the winner of each congressional district and the winner of the state. The change was made to prolong the race, giving lesser known candidates a chance and making it harder for a frontrunner to secure the majority early. It was also hoped that this change in the election system would energize the base of the party.[10][11]

Most of the candidates started their campaigns in the summer of 2011, but after the two first primaries only 4 major campaigns remained.

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The beginning

The start of the 2012 Republican race for president was shaped by the 13 presidential debates of 2011 beginning on May 5. Gary Johnson and Buddy Roemer, both former Governors, were left out of most of the debates, leading to complaints of bias.[12] On December 28, 2011, Johnson withdrew to seek the Libertarian Party nomination and on February 23, 2012, Roemer withdrew to seek the Reform Party and the Americans Elect nomination.

Two candidates from the 2008 presidential primaries, Mitt Romney and Ron Paul, ran again in the 2012 primary campaign. Mitt Romney was an early frontrunner, and he maintained a careful, strategic campaign that centered on being an establishment candidate. In the summer of 2011 he had a lead in polls with the support of much of the Republican electorate.[13] However, his lead over the Republican field was precarious, owing to the entry of new candidates who drew considerable media attention. First congresswoman Michele Bachmann of Minnesota started her campaign in June and surged in the polls after winning the Ames Straw Poll in August, but she lost some of the momentum when Texas Governor Rick Perry shortly after was drafted by strong national Republican support. He performed strongly in polls, immediately becoming a serious contender.[14] But he lost the momentum following poor performances in the September debates. As the third opponent to Romney's lead Herman Cain surged after the sixth debate on September 22. In November Cain's viability as a candidate was seriously jeopardized after several allegations of sexual harassment surfaced in the media, and he suspended his campaign on December 3, 2011, despite his unyielding denials of any misconduct.

In November as Herman Cain's campaign was stumbling former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich asserted himself as the fourth leading opponent to Romney.[15] It was a comeback for Gingrich after his campaign had suffered under serious staff problems just weeks after he had entered the race in May.[16] But in the few weeks before the Iowa caucus, Gingrich's lead quickly began to evaporate. Iowans were bombarded with over $4.4 million in negative advertising on Gingrich from super PACs sympathetic to Mitt Romney and others.[17][18] So on the eve of the Iowa Caucus, the first contest, there was no clear and strong frontrunner.

Tim Pawlenty ended his campaign after finishing third in the Ames Strawpoll. Thaddeus McCotter failed to be invited to any of the debates, suffering "Death by media". Herman Cain suspended his campaign after media reports of alleged sexual misconduct.

Early states

  • Six delegations had primary elections allocating 174 delegates
  • Seven delegations had caucuses starting the process of electing 182 unallocated delegates

In 2012 there were 13 state contests before Super Tuesday, seven caucuses and 5 primaries. Missouri had a nonbinding strawpoll in the form of a primary. Santorum spent months in Iowa, traveling to all 99 counties and holding some 381 town hall meetings.[19] This one state campaign succeeded when he tied with Romney in the Iowa Caucuses on January 3. This first in the nation caucus propelled him into a national campaign while it ended Michele Bachmann's campaign. On the night of the caucuses, Romney was reported the winner of Iowa by only eight votes over Santorum,[20] but after the results were certified, Santorum was declared the winner, beating Romney by 34 votes, despite the results from 8 districts being lost.[21] Newt Gingrich said after Iowa that his positive campaign had been a weakness, and had allowed his rivals to gain the upper hand through negative attacks paid by super PACs supporting them.[22]

Mitt Romney easily won the next contest in New Hampshire, his win in was seen as a given. Romney had persistently showed popularity in that state, but rivals were intensely fighting for a second-place finish there.[23] Jon Huntsman, Jr., a moderate, had staked his candidacy on New Hampshire and invested heavily in at least a strong second place showing, but after 150 campaign events in the state he ended third after Paul. Both he and Rick Perry dropped out of the race shortly before voting day in South Carolina and the two delegates allocated to Huntsman became unbound.

Romney was expected to virtually clinch the nomination with a win in South Carolina, but Gingrich, who is from neighboring Georgia, waged an aggressive and successful campaign winning all but one of the states congressional districts."[24] Gingrich victory in South Carolina together with two strong debate performances gave him a second surge, opening the race to a longer and more unpredictable campaign.

Romney did regain some of his momentum in the next two weeks and won the Florida primary and the Nevada caucuses. However, the race shifted again on February 7, when Santorum swept all three midwestern states voting that day. By doing so he made a case for himself as the Not-Romney candidate and disrupted Romney's narrative as the unstoppable frontrunner.[25]

Following his victories on February 7, Santorum received a huge boost in momentum as conservatives seeking an alternative to Romney began leaving Gingrich for Santorum. Numerous polls taken after Santorum's victories showed him either leading Romney nationally or close behind.[26][27][28][29][30] To regain momentum Romney shelved his "no straw polls" policy and actively campaigned to win the CPAC straw poll, which he won with 38% to Santorums 31%.[31] He also campaigned in Maine, beating Ron Paul by only three percentage points.

Regaining momentum Romney won the remaining four states. The candidates campaigned heavily in Michigan, and even though Romney won the state vote he only won 7 out of 14 congressional districts, the rest went to Santorum. The two delegates allocated at-large in the state was before the election reported to be given proportionally but after the election the Michigan GOP announced there had been an error in the memo published and that the two delegates would be given to the winner, sparking accusations of Romney rigging the results from Santorum's team.[32] After thirteen contests the GOP field for the presidential nomination was still wide open.

Michele Bachmann suspended her campaign on January 4 after ending up sixth in the Iowa caucus. Jon Huntsman Jr. invested heavily in New Hampshire. After finishing third, he suspended his campaign on January 16. Rick Perry suspended his campaign on January 19 after getting fifth place in Iowa and last in New Hampshire.
Early states results
Candidates: Newt
Gingrich
Ron
Paul
Mitt
Romney
Rick
Santorum
Rick
Perry
Jon
Huntsman
Michele
Bachmann
Delegates won 29 8 118 17 0 2 0
Popular vote 990,989
(21.8%)
511,547
(11.2%)
1,854,670
(40,7%)
1,099,596
(24.1%)
30,067
(0.7%)
52,896
(1.2%)
14,324
(0.3%)
States won (Not nonbinding contests) 1 0 5 0 0 0 0
Districts won (Delegate awarding only) 6 0 8 7 0 0 0
Jan. 3 Iowa 13% 21% 25% 25% 10% 1% 5%
Jan. 10 New Hampshire 9%
23%
39% 9% 1% 17%
Jan. 21 South Carolina 40% 13% 28% 17%
Jan. 31 Florida 32% 7% 46% 13%
Feb. 4 Nevada 21% 19% 50% 10%
Feb. 7 Colorado 13% 12% 35% 40%
Missouri 12% 25% 55%
Minnesota 11% 27% 17% 45%
Feb. 4 11 Maine 6% 36% 38% 18%
Feb. 28 Arizona 16% 8% 47% 27%
Michigan 7% 12% 41% 38%
Feb. 11 29 Wyoming 8% 21% 39% 32%
Mar. 3 Washington 10% 25% 38% 24%

Super Tuesday

Mitt Romney campaigning

  • Ten delegations had primary elections allocating 419 delegates

Super Tuesday 2012 is the name for March 6, the day on which the largest simultaneous number of state presidential primary elections was held in the United States. This election cycles edition of Super Tuesday, where 18.3% of all delegates was allocated, was considerably smaller than the 2008 edition, where 41.5% of all delegates was allocated (twenty-one states with 901 delegates).[33] In 2012 delegates were allocated in primaries in seven states and their sixty five congressional districts together with caucuses in three states.[34]

Romney secured more than half the delegates Super Tuesday but did not secure his status as the inevitable nominiee. Gingrich pursued a "southern strategy", winning his homestate of Georgia and even though Santorum carried 3 states he did not win them with a large enough margen to secure him status as the Not-Romney candidate. In the weeks up to March 6 both candidates had experiences ballot problems, failing to appear on the Virginia primary ballot, leaving that race to Romney and Paul. With only two candidates on the ballot Paul got 40% of the votes and carried one of Virginias eleven congressional districts.

Santorum had also failed to submit full or any delegate slates in nine of Ohio's congressional districts[35] making him unable to win all delegates in those districts. The state became the big battleground of Super Tuesday and its delegates were split between Romney and Santorum, who won three congressional districts where he didnt have a full slate. This created four unallocated delegates, whose status are to be determined in April. Adding to the uncertainty of these four delegates are the ongoing internal fight in the Ohio GOP central committee.[36]

Super Tuesday results
Candidates: Newt
Gingrich
Ron
Paul
Mitt
Romney
Rick
Santorum
Delegates won (OH-4 unalloc.) 81 21 222 91
Popular vote 836,903
(23%)
419,800
(11%)
1,406,599
(38%)
998,762
(27%)
States won 1 0 6 3
Districts won (Delegate awarding only) 13 1 33 18
Alaska 14% 24% 33% 29%
Georgia 47% 6% 26% 20%
Idaho 2% 18% 62% 18%
Massachusetts 5% 10% 72% 12%
North Dakota 8% 28% 24% 40%
Ohio 15% 9% 38% 37%
Oklahoma 27% 10% 28% 34%
Tennessee 24% 9% 28% 37%
Vermont 8% 25% 40% 24%
Virginia 40% 60%

March and April

Rick Santorum campaigning

  • Ten delegations have primary election allocating 325 delegates
  • Missouries delegation had caucuses starting the process of electing 49 unallocated delegates
    • Four smaller peninsulare territories elected 24 delegates directly at their caucuses
    • Four delegations ends the election process for 107 unallocated delegates at state and district conventions

The four smaller peninsulare territories (Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa and U.S. Virgin Islands) did not take any strawpoll at their caucuses. Neither did the Missouri caucuses where no delegates was allocated or elected, a nonbinding primary had been held in February. And neither does most local conventions electing unallocated delegates. Therefore does the convention results table not show popular vote percentages but the number of delegates committted to each candidate.

Even though Romney only carried two states and Puerto Rico, he still secured more than half the delegates as he won all the delegates from the smaller territories except two delegate from the Virgin Islands. One was secured by Paul and one was elected as uncommitted, and one delegate who was elected as uncommitted later pledged himself to Romney. In Wyoming, one delegate was also elected as uncommitted.[37] By winning three primaries in the south, Santorum disrupted Gingrich's "southern strategy" and took the lead as the Not-Romney candidate. Gingrich won one congressional district and secured only 25 delegates in March. Three days after the Louisiana primary he announced a new "National Convention strategy", which includes laying off one-third of the campaign staff and spending less time on the road campaigning.[38]

Santorum's ballot problems continue in April, when he is not on the ballot in Washington D.C.[39]

March and April primary results
Candidates: Newt
Gingrich
Ron
Paul
Mitt
Romney
Rick
Santorum
Delegates won 25 3 107 95
Popular vote 383,739
(18%)
148,310
(7%)
866,478
(40%)
752,115
(35%)
States and territories won 0 0 3 4
Districts won (Delegate awarding only) 1 0 19 14
Mar. 10 Kansas 14% 13% 21% 51%
Mar. 13 Alabama 29% 5% 29% 35%
Hawaii 11% 19% 45% 25%
Mississippi 31% 4% 31% 33%
Mar. 18 Puerto Rico 2% 2% 83% 8%
Mar. 20 Illinois 8% 9% 47% 35%
Mar. 24 Louisiana 16% 6% 27% 49%
Apr. 3 District of Columbia - - -
Maryland - - - -
Wisconsin - - - -
March and April convention results
Candidates: Newt
Gingrich
Ron
Paul
Mitt
Romney
Rick
Santorum
Uncom.
Delegates won - 2 30 2 2
States and territories won 4
Districts won (Delegate awarding only) 1
Mar. 6-10 Wyoming (County) - 1 8 2 1
Mar. 10 Guam - - 6 - -
Northern Mariana Is. - - 6 - -
U.S. Virgin Islands - 1 4 - 1
Mar. 13 American Samoa - - 6 - -
Apr. 12-13 Colorado (CD) - - - - -
Apr. 14 Colorado (State) - - - - -
Wyoming (State) - - - - -
Apr. 14-21 Minnesota (CD) - - - - -
Apr. 21 Missouri (CD) - - - - -
Newt Gingrich campaigning Ron Paul campaigning

April 24

  • Five delegations have primary election allocating 209 delegates
April 24 results
Candidates: Newt
Gingrich
Ron
Paul
Mitt
Romney
Rick
Santorum
Delegates won - - - -
Popular vote -
(-%)
-
(-%)
-
(-%)
-
(-%)
States won
Districts won (Delegate awarding only)
Connecticut - - - -
Delaware - - - -
New York - - - -
Pennsylvania - - - -
Rhode Island - - - -

Schedule and process

The primary election takes place from January 3 to July 14 and will allocate and elect 2,286 voting delegates to the 2012 Republican National Convention in the week of August 27.

The total base number of delegates allocated to each of the 50 U.S. states is 10 at-large delegates, plus 3 delegates per congressional district. In addition, fixed numbers of at-large delegates are allocated to Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Northern Mariana Islands under the party's delegate selection rules.[40] States are awarded bonus delegates based on the following factors:

  • Bonus delegates to each state that cast a majority of their Electoral College votes for the Grand Old Party (GOP) candidate in the 2008 presidential election
  • One bonus delegate for each GOP senator
  • One bonus delegate to each state that has a GOP majority in their delegation to the House of Representatives
  • One bonus delegate for each state that has a GOP governor
  • Bonus delegates for majorities in one or all of the chambers in their state legislature.

The two Republican National Committee members from each state and territory and the chairperson of the state's Republican Party are delegates unless the state is penalized for violating the RNC's scheduling rules. The individual states decide whether these delegates are bound or unbound.

Scheduling problems

The 2008 Republican National Convention decided that the 2012 primary schedule generally would be subject to the same rules as the 2008 delegate selection contests.[41] But on August 6, 2010, the Republican National Committee (RNC) adopted new rules for the timing of elections, with 103 votes in favor out of 144.[42] Under this plan, elections for delegates to the national convention were to be divided into three periods:[43]

  • February 1 March 5, 2012: Contests of traditional early states Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina,
  • March 6 31, 2012: Contests that proportionally allocate delegates,
  • April 1, 2012, and onward: All other contests including winner-take-all elections.

Several states, most notably Florida, scheduled their contests earlier than prescribed. This pressured every traditional early state except Nevada to push back their contest into January. As a result of their violation of RNC rules, these states were penalized with a loss of half their delegates, including voting right for RNC delegates. Despite having early caucuses, Iowa, Maine, Colorado, Minnesota and Missouri were not automatically penalized, because their contests do not bind national delegates until after the prescribed time period for the early voting states.[44]

Delegation breakdown

Primaries and caucuses can allocated delegates (binding) or they can not (unbinding). It is not possible to know the presidential preference of the unallocated bound delegates before they are actual elected at state and district conventions along with the bound delegates already allocated. The 2,286 voting delegates to the 2012 Republican National Convention can be divided into three main groups:

  • 1,944 bound delegates are allocated to the candidates at caucuses and primaries or later at local conventions.
  • 222 unbound elected delegates 5 of them was scheduled to be bound delegates but 3 were elected as uncommitted and 2 were allocated to Huntsman but became unbound.[45]
  • 120 unbound RNC delegates are not a part of the primary process. [8]

The numbers of delegates in these three groups are not static as the local state parties can change the rules of their primary or the election process can change scheduled bound delegates into unbound. Local conventions can elect delegates scheduled to be bound as uncommitted or they can bind delegates scheduled to be unbound. if a candidates that have already been allocated candidates drops out of the race these delegates can become unbound.

The 56 state and territory delegations to the National Convention Delegates can be broken up into groups according to when they have their contests:

  • Early States: 12 states with 374 delegates.
    • 240 bound delegates, 66 of these are allocated later. (two allocated to Huntsman are unbound)
    • 116 unbound elected delegates, all elected later.
    • 18 unbound RNC delegates.
  • Super Tuesday States: 10 delegations with 437 delegates.
    • 419 bound delegates.
    • 18 unbound RNC delegates.
  • March and April States: 14 delegations with 446 delegates.
    • 387 bound delegates. 25 of these are allocated later. (two delegates from the Virgin Islands were elected as uncommitted)
    • 24 unbound elected delegates, 12 of these are elected later.
    • 36 unbound RNC delegates.
      • 26 bound delegates from earlier contests are allocated. (Wyoming, one delegate was elected as uncommitted)
      • 57 unbound delegates from earlier contests are elected. (Colorado and Minnesota CD)
  • April 24 States: 5 delegations with 231 delegates (The third largest votingdate)
    • 219 bound delegates.
    • 10 unbound elected delegates, all selected later.
    • 12 unbound RNC delegates.
  • May States: 8 delegations with 424 delegates. (From April 28 to June 2)
    • 359 bound delegates. (Louisiana had a Primary Mar. 24 allocating 15 bound delegates, these are counted in March)
    • 44 unbound elected delegates, 13 are elected later.
    • 21 unbound RNC delegates.
      • 65 bound delegates from earlier contests are allocated. (Missouri AL and Washington State AL/CD)
      • 34 unbound delegates from earlier contests are elected. (Maine and Minnesota AL)
  • June 5 States: 4 delegations with 273 delegates (The second largest votingdate)
    • 364 bound delegates
    • 9 unbound RNC delegates.
  • Late States: 3 delegations with 101 delegates.
    • 336 bound delegates,
    • 23 unbound elected delegates.
    • 6 unbound RNC delegates.
      • 63 unbound delegates from earlier contests are elected. (Illinois AL, Indiana AL, Iowa and Pennsylvania AL)

Primary schedule

This table shows how and when the National Convention delegates are allocated for the candidates. This means it do not include straw polls, primary or other kinds. And it do not include the dates for different local conventions where the delegates are already bound by an earlier primary or caucus. [46]

  • Date: This is the date where the delegates are bound to a candidate or the date where the first step to electing the delegates is taken. If delegates are not bound and/or elected at the first date, the later date where they are so is also listed. Some states have caucuses that stretches for more than one day. (Louisiana has two dates because the state has two first step elections, both a primary and caucuses). If a state convention stretches for more than one day it is the end date that are used.
  • State: In addition to the fifty state contests there are also five territorial contests and one federal district contest
  • There are three types of delegates. In this table they are listed by the way the candidates secure them, in a few states that is by the at-large state vote even though the individual delegates are selected on the district level.
    • (RNC) 2 members of the Republican National Committee and the state party chairperson from each non-penalized state are voting delegates at the national convention by virtue of their position. But this colum only lists party delegates that are not bound by their states primary or caucus result. These 120 delegates are free to committed themselve without regard to the primary result of their state [47] and are as such not a part of the primary process this table provides informations about.
    • (AL) Delegates elected At-Large in the state or territory. This included RNC delegates that are bound to the election result.
    • (CD) Delegates elected in each Congressional District
  • Contest type: There are two types: Caucus and Primary, which are regulated in many different ways in the local states.
  • Bound delegates: These pledged delegates are legally bound to vote for a candidate for at least the first ballot at the National Convention. All 3 types of delegates can be bound, depending on the local state rules.
  • Unbound delegates: This is AL and CD delegates that are unbound (unpledged). They are elected at local conventions in their states, and the candidates work to get as many of their supporters to join these conventions through caucus and primaries in the respective states.[48] It does not included unbound RNC delegates.
  • Delegate allocation: It can be the same on both the state and district level or it can be different. The 2012 election has more proportionally-allocated contests than the 2008 election.
    • Winner-take-all. In some state and districts this method will not be used unless one candidate gets a majority of all the votes. States may use winner-take-all and allocate delegates by CD (congressional district), in which case different CDs may go to different candidates. States may use winner-take-all allocation and allocate all delegates at large, in which case the state delegation as a whole is winner-take-all.
    • Proportional. Most states that elect delegates proportionally have thresholds that candidates must meet to be given delegates; these thresholds range from 10% to 25% percent of the votes. But a few states that elect delegates proportionally have no such threshold.
    • Loophole. The original advisory preference/delegate selection type of primary, where the voters vote for the candidate in an advisory primary and separately vote for a candidate slate. So even though the delegates technically are unbound, they will, by using the loophole, become practically bound to a candidate.[49]
    • Convention. If the national convention delegates are unbound or they are not bound at the first caucuses held in the state, the state convention is where they get elected.
    • Committee. The state GOP executive committee selects the delegates.
  • Secured delegates: There are two ways to secure a delegate for a candidate. The delegate can be legally bound to a candidate via the state contest, or the delegate can personally commit to support a candidate. These colums do only account for legally bound delegates and elected unbound delegates (Superdelegates), not for the unbound party delegates (RNC). Unbound elected delegates falls into three categories for a total of 222: 217 unbound delegates elected at conventions, 3 bound delegates elected as uncommitted and 2 delegates that were allocated to Huntsman but are now unbound.[50][51]
    The last colum (uncom.) lists delegates that have still not committed themselve to a candidate, one way or another. This include delegates elected as uncommitted, unbound elected delegates, delegates elected as bound, but now released from their candidate and delegates not yet allocated or elected. It does not included unbound RNC delegates.

This is a sortable table links provide quick paths to more information on the different state primaries:

  • By clicking on the link in the 'State' column you will go to the Wikipedia article on the state or territory.
  • By clicking on the link in the 'Contest Type' column you will go to the state or territory primary or caucuses article.
  • Click the triangles to sort any column, including delegate columns. Click twice to bring the largest numbers to the top.
! State delegation Delegate status Secured delegates (excl. unbound RNC delegates)
Date State RNC AL CD Total Contest type Unbound Bound Allocation Gingrich Paul Romney Santorum Uncom.
Iowa
3
13
12
28
Caucus (nonbinding)
0
0
(See June 16)

New Hampshire#
0
12
0
12
Primary (semi-closed)
2
10
Proportional (AL)
(No CD Allocation)
3
7
2
South Carolina#
0
11
14
25
Primary (open)
0
25
Winner-take-all (AL)
Winner-take-all (CD)
23
2
Florida#
0
50
0
50
Primary (closed)
0
50
Winner-take-all (AL)
(No CD allocation)
50
Nevada
0
28
0
28
Caucus (binding)
0
28
Proportional (AL)
(No CD Allocation)
6
5
14
3
Colorado
3
12
21
36
Caucus (nonbinding)
0
0
(AL see April 14)
(CD see April 13)
Minnesota
3
13
24
40
Caucus (nonbinding)
0
0
(AL see May 15)
(CD see April 21)
Maine
3
15
6
24
Caucus (nonbinding)
0
0
(See May 6)
Arizona#
0
29
0
29
Primary (closed)
0
29
Winner-take-all (AL)
(No CD allocation)
29
Michigan#
0
2
28
30
Primary (open)
0
30
Winner-take-all (AL)
Winner-take-all (CD)
16
14
Wyoming
3
14
12
29
Caucus (nonbinding)
0
0
(AL see April 14)
(CD see March 10)
Washington
3
10
30
43
Caucus (nonbinding)
0
0
(see June 2)
Alaska
3
24
0
27
Caucus (binding)
0
24
Proportional (AL)
(No CD Allocation)
2
6
8
8
Georgia
0
34
42
76
Primary (open)
0
76
Proportional (AL)
Proportional (CD)
55
18
3
Idaho
0
32
0
32
Caucus (binding)
0
32
Winner-take-all (AL)
(No CD Allocation)
32
Massachusetts
3
38
0
41
Primary (semi-closed)
0
38
Proportional (AL)
(No CD Allocation)
38
North Dakota
0
28
0
28
Caucus (binding)
0
28
Proportional (AL)b
(No CD Allocation)
2
8
7
11
Ohio
3
15
48
66
Primary (semi-closed)
0
63
Proportional (AL)b
Winner-take-all (CD)b
38
21
4
Oklahoma
3
25
15
43
Primary (closed)
0
40
Proportional (AL)
Proportional(CD)
13
13
14
Tennessee
3
28
27
58
Primary (open)
0
55
Proportional (AL)
Proportional(CD)
9
16
30
Vermont
0
14
3
17
Primary (open)
0
17
Proportional (AL)
Winner-take-all (CD)
4
9
4
Virginia
3
13
33
49
Primary (open)
0
46
Winner-take-all (AL)
Winner-take-all (CD)
3
43
Wyoming
3
14
12
29
Convention
1
11
Caucus (CD)bd
1
8
2
1
Kansas
0
28
12
40
Caucus (binding)
0
40
Proportional (AL)
Winner-take-all (CD)
7
33
Guam
3
6
0
9
Caucus (nonbinding)
6
0
Caucus
6
Northern Mariana Is.
3
6
0
9
Caucus (nonbinding)
6
0
Caucus
6
U.S. Virgin Islands
3
6
0
9
Caucus (binding)e
2
4
Caucus
1
4
1
Alabama
3
26
21
50
Primary (open)
0
47
Proportional (AL)
Proportional (CD)
13
12
22
American Samoa
3
6
0
9
Caucus (binding)
0
6
Caucus
6
Hawaii
3
11
6
20
Caucus (binding)
0
17
Proportional (AL)
Proportional (CD)
3
9
5
Mississippi
3
25
12
40
Primary (open)
0
37
Proportional (AL)
Proportional (CD)
12
12
13
Puerto Rico
3
20
0
23
Primary (open)
0
20
Winner-take-all
20
Illinois
3
12
54
69
Primary (semi-closed)
0
54
Loophole (CD)b
(AL see June 19)
42
12
Missouri
3
25
24
52
Caucus (nonbinding)
0
0
(AL see June 2)
(CD see April 21)
Louisianaf
3
15
0
18
Primary (closed)
0
15
Proportional (AL)
5
10
Maryland
0
13
24
37
Primary (closed)
0
37
Winner-take-all (AL)
Winner-take-all (CD)
37
Washington, D.C.
3
16
0
19
Primary (closed)
0
16
Winner-take-all
16
Wisconsin
0
18
24
42
Primary (open)
0
42
Winner-take-all (AL)
Winner-take-all (CD)
42
Colorado
3
12
21
36
Convention
21
0
Caucus (CD)
21
Wyoming
3
14
12
29
Convention
0
14
Caucus (AL)b
14
Colorado
3
12
21
36
Convention
12
0
Caucus (AL)
12
Minnesota
3
13
24
40
Convention
24
0
Caucus (CD)
24
Missouri
3
25
24
52
Convention
0
24
Caucus (CD)
24
Connecticut
3
10
15
28
Primary (closed)
0
25
Proportional (AL)c
Winner-take-all (CD)
25
Delaware
0
17
0
17
Primary (closed)
0
17
Winner-take-all (AL)
(No CD allocation)
17
New York
3
34
58
95
Primary (closed)
0
92
Proportional (AL)c
Winner-take-all(CD)
92
Pennsylvania
3
10
59
72
Primary (closed)
10
59
Loophole (CD)
(AL see June 10)
59
Rhode Island
3
0
16
19
Primary (semi-closed)
0
16
Proportional (CD)
(No AL Allocation)
16
Louisianaf
0
10
18
28
Caucus (nonbinding)
0
0
(See June 2)
Minnesota
3
13
24
40
Convention
13
0
Caucus (AL) a
13
Maine
3
15
6
24
Convention
21
0
Caucus (AL)
Caucus (CD)
21
Indiana
3
16
27
46
Primary (open)
0
27
Winner-take-all (CD)
(AL see June 9)
27
North Carolina
3
52
0
55
Primary (semi-closed)
0
52
Proportional (AL)
(No CD Allocation)
52
West Virginia
3
19
9
31
Primary (semi-closed)
0
28
Proportional (AL)
Proportional(CD)
28
Oregon
3
25
0
28
Primary (closed)
0
25
Proportional (AL)
(No CD Allocation)
25
Arkansas
3
21
12
36
Primary (open)
0
33
Proportional (AL)
Proportional(CD)c
33
Kentucky
3
24
18
45
Primary (closed)
0
42
Proportional (AL)
Proportional(CD)
42
Texas
3
44
108
155
Primary (open)
0
152
Proportional (AL)
Proportional(CD)
152
Louisiana
0
10
18
28
Convention
28
0
Committee (Al)
Caucus (CD)
23
Missouri
3
25
24
52
Convention
0
25
Caucus (AL)
25
Washington
3
10
30
43
Convention
0
40
Caucus (AL)
Caucus (CD)
40
California
3
10
159
172
Primary (closed)
0
169
Winner-take-all (AL)
Winner-take-all (CD)
169
New Jersey
0
50
0
50
Primary (semi-closed)
0
50
Winner-take-all (AL)
(No CD allocation)
50
New Mexico
3
11
9
23
Primary (closed)
0
20
Proportional (AL)
Proportional(CD)
20
South Dakota
3
25
0
28
Primary (closed)
0
25
Proportional (AL)
(No CD Allocation)
25
Illinois
3
12
54
69
Convention
12
0
Caucus (AL)
12
Indiana
3
16
27
46
Convention
16
0
Caucus (AL)
16
Nebraska
3
23
9
35
Caucus (nonbinding)
0
0
(See July 14)
Pennsylvania
3
10
59
72
Meeting
10
0
Committee (AL)
10
Iowa
3
13
12
28
Convention
25
0
Caucus (AL)
Caucus (CD)
25
Montana
3
23
0
26
Caucus (nonbinding)g
23
0
Caucus (AL)
(No CD Allocation)
23
Utah
0
40
0
40
Primary (semi-closed)
0
40
Winner-take-all (AL)
(No CD allocation)
40
Nebraska
3
23
9
35
Convention
0
32
Caucus (AL)
Caucus (CD)
32

Notes

# The state is penalized for breaking RNC schedule guidelines. The penalty cuts the delegation number in half and removes voting privileges from the party leader delegates.
a The state, district or territory convention can vote to bind its delegates.
b Delegates are morally but not legally bound to a candidate.
c If any candidate receives more than 50% of the votes it becomes a Winner-take-all contest.
d Wyoming has only one congressional district, but the 12 CD delegates are elected in the 23 counties that are paired together.
e Delegates from the Virgin Islands are legally bound if they are elected as pledged to a candidate.
f Louisiana allocated 15 bound delegates in their March 24 primary election and starts the process of allocation the 28 unbound delegates with their April 28 district caucuses.
The state delegation have a total of 46 delegates that are split in two rows. (1.Primary and 3 RNC (18) 2.Caucuses (28))
g Montana's caucus is its convention. The delegates to this caucus are selected by the counties' central committees at least 10 days before the date of state convention.

See also

References

External links

de:Vorwahlergebnisse der Pr sidentschaftswahl in den Vereinigten Staaten 2012 es:Primarias presidenciales del Partido Republicano de 2012 fr:Primaire pr sidentielle du Parti r publicain am ricain de 2012 it:Primarie presidenziali del Partito repubblicano americane del 2012 he: 2012 no:Det republikanske presidentkandidatvalget 2012 pl:Prawybory prezydenckie Partii Republika skiej w 2012 roku pt:Elei es prim rias do Partido Republicano em 2012






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