Search: in
Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke
Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke in Encyclopedia Encyclopedia
  Tutorials     Encyclopedia     Videos     Books     Software     DVDs  
       





Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke

The House of Cartsburn
The Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke in the Baronage of Scotland was confirmed in favour of Thomas Crawfurd of Cartsburn in 1669, when those parts of the lands of the Barony of Cartsburn known as Cartsdyke or Crawfurdsdyke were erected into a free Burgh of Barony to be called the Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke. Crawfurdsdyke, now commonly called Cartsdyke, has its own railway station.

The charter erecting the lands of Crawfurdsdyke into a Burgh of Barony included the rights to a harbour. The lands of Cartsburn in the Parish of Easter Greenock in the Shire of Renfrew were erected in liberam baronium, as a free Barony held of the Prince and Great Steward of Scotland. The estate of Cartsburn, also known as Crawfurdsburn, incorporated the lands of Cartsdyke, or Crawfurdsdyke, and part of the lands of Easter Greenock Castle. The dignity of Baron of the Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke is a feudal Barony of Scotland. The seat of the Burgh of Barony was the House of Cartsburn, built in the 17th century near Greenock, Renfrewshire.

The most notable Barons of Crawfurdsdyke were Thomas Crawfurd of Cartsburn, 4th Baron of Cartsburn, Thomas Macknight Crawfurd of Cartsburn and Lauriston Castle, 8th Baron of Cartsburn, and Mark Lindley-Highfield of Ballumbie Castle, 14th Baron of Cartsburn. The current Baron of the Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke is the 15th Baron of Crawfurdsyke of the Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke. Other people associated with the Barony include George Crawfurd, the compiler of The Peerage of Scotland, the inventor James Watt, the nation's bard Robert Burns, and the poet Jean Adam.

Contents


Erection

In his work The History of Greenock of 1921, Robert Murray Smith makes clear that the Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke first came into existence in 1642:

Crawfurdsdyke (according to Weir) was erected into a Burgh of Barony by Charles II in 1669, the Charter

being granted in favour of Thomas Crawfurd of Cartsburn. Authorities are at variance with reference to both of these Charters and to the powers and privileges conferred by them. It has been argued that the real foundation of Greenock as town and port was by Act of Parliament in 1670, ratified in 1681. Ramsay, in Views of Renfrewshire , says that the only privilege conferred by the Charter of 1635 was the liberty of holding at Greenock a weekly market on Fridays and two yearly Fairs. George Crawfurd, third son of the first Baron of Crawfurdsdyke, gives the date of Greenock erection as about the year 1642, and Ramsay states that Crawfurdsdyke was erected a Burgh of Barony in 1633, that it possessed a pier, and that it was of more importance than Greenock; while Robertson, who continued Craufurd's History of Renfrewshire , says that Crawfurdsdyke was erected in 1636, about forty years before Greenock. Williamson pertinently points out that this assertion was made on the erroneous assumption that 1685 was the date of Greenock Charter, instead of 1635. He also states that there can be no reasonable doubt that the Charter of 1642 was that which contained the legal erection of the Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke, not a Charter of 1633.[1]

That Cartsburn and Crawfurdsdyke are distinct can be told by the fact that the 1669 erection confirmed there to be both a free barony of Cartsburn and a free burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke. This is further confirmed by the fact that the Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke preceded Cartsburn in its date of original creation: 1642.[1] However, the dignity of Baron of the Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke remained a privilege of the Baron of Cartsburn until alienated by the same in 2008.

History

The Barony of Cartsburn and Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke in the Baronage of Scotland were created for Thomas Crawfurd of Cartsburn in 1669, when the lands of Cartsburn in the Parish of Easter Greenock in the Shire of Renfrew were erected in liberam baronium, as a free Barony and a free Burgh of Barony held of the Prince and Great Steward of Scotland.[2][3]

The estate of Cartsburn, also known as Crawfurdsburn, incorporated the lands of Cartsdyke, or Crawfurdsdyke, and part of the lands of Easter Greenock Castle. The dignity of Baron of the Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke is a feudal Barony of Scotland. The seat of the Burgh of Barony was the House of Cartsburn, built in the 17th century near Greenock, Renfrewshire. Crawfurdsdyke, now commonly called Cartsdyke, has its own railway station. The charter erecting the lands of Crawfurdsdyke into a Burgh of Barony included the rights to a harbour. 'The earliest vessel which crossed the Atlantic from Greenock was in July, 1684, and contained 22 persons, who were sentenced at Glasgow to be transported to Carolina.' [4]

Excerpts from the Baron Court Book of Cartsburn and Crawfurdsdyke have been published, rendering it one of the few baronies with comprehensive evidence for research into the social history of the area.[2] George Crawfurd, the compiler of the notable and esteemed work The Peerage of Scotland, belonged to the family of Crawfurd of Cartsburn and was the brother of the second Baron.[5] It is suspected that it was through George Crawfurd's genealogical writings that the manuscript of Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel's memoirs came into the possession of the Crawfurds of Cartsburn, which William Macknight Crawfurd of Ratho, the seventh Baron, then donated for publication.[6]

Other people associated with the Burgh of Barony include the inventor James Watt, the nation's bard Robert Burns, and the poet Jean Adam. The famous inventor, James Watt grew up within the Barony. His father and namesake, James Watt, was contracted to enlarge the mansion house of Sir John Shaw, 2nd Baronet at Greenock, and his grandfather, Thomas Watt, was Bailie of the Barony of Cartsburn and the Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke.[2] Robert Burns was invited to stay at the estate at the invitation of the 4th Baron, Thomas Crawfurd of Cartsburn. He later mentioned the Baron in his work.[7] Jean Adam's published poems of 1734 were dedicated to the Baron of Cartsburn.[8]

Alienation

Included within the Crown charter of 1669 was the erection of those parts of the lands of the Barony of Cartsburn known as Cartsdyke or Crawfurdsdyke into a free Burgh of Barony to be called the Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke; its 'free' status rendering it subject to alienation. In 2008 the dignity of Baron of Crawfurdsdyke of the Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke was alienated from the same ownership as the dignity of the Barony of Cartsburn, excepting from this alienation any residual rights pertaining to the Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke, but excepting from that exception any heraldic privilege and quality or precedence preserved by the Abolition of Feudal Tenure (Scotland) Act 2000. This meant that the Baron of Cartsburn retained any remaining historic rights over the Burgh of Barony other than the dignity of Baron of the Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke itself and its heraldic privileges and qualities and precedence. These are separate to any heraldic privilege and quality and precedence pertaining to the dignity of Baron of Cartsburn.

Notable Barons

Thomas Crawfurd of Cartsburn, 4th Baron of Cartsburn, invited Robert Burns to stay at his country estate at Cartsburn.[9][10] Burns himself writes of Thomas Crawfurd of Cartsburn's "ingenious, friendly, and elegant epistle".[7] In his Preface to the Memoirs of Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel, Chief of the Clan Cameron, James Macknight describes Thomas as "a person of superior literary attainments", who "collected a considerable library".[6]

Thomas Macknight Crawfurd of Cartsburn and Lauriston Castle, 8th Baron of Cartsburn was credited with a number of ameliorations to the grounds of Lauriston Castle, a property which he acquired in 1871.[11] He made general improvements to Lauriston, including the bringing of a number of architectural features from his estate at Cartsburn.[12]

Mark Lindley-Highfield of Ballumbie Castle, the 14th Baron of Cartsburn, when a student and editor of Gaudie, the newspaper of the University of Aberdeen, resigned in protest at editorial interference from the University's Students' Association. His campaign for editorial independence received the support of Orkey & Shetland MP Alistair Carmichael and Moray MP Angus Robertson, who tabled an Early Day Motion in Parliament criticising the Students' Association's "ill-advised move".[13]

Barons of Crawfurdsdyke

The following is a list of the Barons of the Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke, from 1669 to the present:[2][14][15]

  • Thomas Crawfurd of Cartsburn (1669–1695)
  • Thomas Crawfurd of Cartsburn (1695–1743)
  • Archibald Crawfurd of Cartsburn (1743–1783)
  • Thomas Crawfurd of Cartsburn (1783–1791)
  • Christian Crawfurd of Crawfurdsburn (1791–1796) (married Robert Arthur)
  • Christian Crawfurd of Crawfurdsburn (1796–1818) (married Thomas Macknight of Ratho)
  • William Macknight Crawfurd of Ratho (1818–1855)
  • Thomas Macknight Crawfurd of Cartsburn and Lauriston Castle (1856–1909)
  • Marion Woddrop Dennistoun Mitchell Crawfurd of Cartsburn (1909–1912) (married James Dennistoun Mitchell of Carwood)
  • Lilian Parkinson or Macknight Crawfurd of Cartsburn (1912–1912) (liferent)
  • Robert Arthur Christie Crawfurd of Cartsburn (1912–1935) (with liferent to Lilian Parkinson or Macknight Crawfurd)
  • Amy Christie Crawfurd of Cartsburn (1935–1958) (held in trust for her sons by her husband, 1958–1974)
  • Alan Howard Crawfurd Colls (1958–2008) (as senior heir and joint holder with his brother Richard Andrew Colls, for both of whom the Barony and the Burgh of Barony were held in trust 1958–1974)
  • Mark Paul Lindley-Highfield of Ballumbie Castle (2008–2008)
  • Gregory Paul Highfield, 15th Baron of the Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke (2008–)

See also

References






Source: Wikipedia | The above article is available under the GNU FDL. | Edit this article



Search for Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke in Tutorials
Search for Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke in Encyclopedia
Search for Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke in Videos
Search for Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke in Books
Search for Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke in Software
Search for Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke in DVDs
Search for Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke in Store




Advertisement




Burgh of Barony of Crawfurdsdyke in Encyclopedia
Burgh_of_Barony_of_Crawfurdsdyke top Burgh_of_Barony_of_Crawfurdsdyke

Home - Add TutorGig to Your Site - Disclaimer

©2011-2013 TutorGig.info All Rights Reserved. Privacy Statement