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111th United States Congress

Inauguration of Barack Obama at the U.S. Capitol, January 20, 2009. President Obama signing the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 into law, January 29, 2009. Sonia Sotomayor testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee on her appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court, July 13, 2009. addressing Congress regarding health care reform]], September 9, 2009. Tea Party protests in front of the U.S. Capitol, September 12, 2009. President Obama delivering the 2010 State of the Union Address, January 25, 2010. President Obama signing the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law, March 23, 2010. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy swearing in Elena Kagan during her first day of testimony on her appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court, June 28, 2010 Congressional leaders meeting with President Obama, November 30, 2010. President Obama signing the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010 into law, January 2, 2011. The One Hundred Eleventh United States Congress was the meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government from January 3, 2009, until January 3, 2011. It began during the last two weeks of the George W. Bush administration, with the remainder spanning the first two years of Barack Obama's presidency. It was composed of the Senate and the House of Representatives. The apportionment of seats in the House was based on the 2000 U.S. Census. In the November 4, 2008 elections, the Democratic Party increased its majorities in both chambers. A new delegate seat was created for the Northern Mariana Islands.[1]

Contents


Major events

  • January 2009: Two Senate seats were disputed when the Congress convened:
    1. An appointment dispute over the Illinois seat vacated by President Barack Obama arose following Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich's alleged solicitation of bribes in exchange for an appointment to the Senate. Roland Burris (D) was appointed to the seat on December 31, 2008, his credentials were accepted on January 12, 2009, and he was sworn in to office on January 15, 2009.
    2. An election dispute over the Minnesota seat previously held by Norm Coleman (R), between Coleman and challenger Al Franken (D), was decided in late June 2009 in favor of Franken,[2] who was sworn in on July 7, 2009.[3]
  • January 8, 2009: Joint session counted the Electoral College votes of the 2008 presidential election.[4]
  • January 20, 2009: Inauguration of President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden.
  • September 9, 2009: President Obama addressed a joint session of Congress to promote health care reform, which Representative Joe Wilson (R) interrupted by shouting at the President.
  • January 25, 2010: 2010 State of the Union Address
  • April 20, 2010: Deepwater Horizon oil spill
  • November 2, 2010: 2010 general elections, in which Republicans regained control of the House while the Democrats remained in control of the Senate.

Major legislation

Enacted

  • January 29, 2009: Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009,
  • February 4, 2009: Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (SCHIP),
  • February 17, 2009: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA),
  • March 11, 2009: Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009,
  • March 30, 2009: Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009,
  • April 21, 2009: Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act,
  • May 20, 2009: Fraud Enforcement and Recovery Act of 2009,
  • May 20, 2009: Helping Families Save Their Homes Act of 2009,
  • May 22, 2009: Weapon Systems Acquisition Reform Act of 2009,
  • May 22, 2009: Credit CARD Act of 2009,
  • June 22, 2009: Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, as Division A of
  • June 24, 2009: Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2009 including the Car Allowance Rebate System (Cash for Clunkers),
  • October 28, 2009: National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010, including the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act,
  • November 6, 2009: Worker, Homeownership, and Business Assistance Act of 2009,
  • December 16, 2009: Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010,
  • February 12, 2010: Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act, as Title I of
  • March 4, 2010: Travel Promotion Act of 2009, as Section 9 of
  • March 18, 2010: Hiring Incentives to Restore Employment Act,
  • March 23, 2010: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act,
  • March 30, 2010: Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, including the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act,
  • May 5, 2010: Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010,
  • July 1, 2010: Comprehensive Iran Sanctions, Accountability, and Divestment Act of 2010,
  • July 21, 2010: Dodd Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act,
  • August 3, 2010: Fair Sentencing Act of 2010,
  • August 10, 2010: SPEECH Act,
  • September 27, 2010: Small Business Jobs and Credit Act of 2010,
  • December 8, 2010: Claims Resolution Act of 2010,
  • December 13, 2010: Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010,
  • December 17, 2010: Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act of 2010, ,
  • December 22, 2010: Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act of 2010, ,
  • January 2, 2011: James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010, ,
  • January 4, 2011: Shark Conservation Act, ,
  • January 4, 2011: Food Safety and Modernization Act, ,

Health care reform

At the encouragement of the Obama administration, Congress devoted significant time considering health care reform. In March 2010, Obama signed the Senate-crafted Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law, the first comprehensive health care reform legislation in decades, and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 which further amended the Senate bill and also included the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act. Other major reform proposals during the health care debate included:

Proposed

(in alphabetical order)
  • American Clean Energy and Security Act
  • District of Columbia House Voting Rights Act
  • Domestic Partnership Benefits and Obligations Act
  • DREAM Act
  • Employee Free Choice Act
  • Employment Non-Discrimination Act
  • Federal Reserve Transparency Act of 2009
  • Food Safety Enhancement Act
  • Gun Show Loophole Closing Act of 2009
  • Military Readiness Enhancement Act
  • Native Hawaiian Government Reorganization Act
  • Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2009
  • Public Option Act
  • Respect for Marriage Act
  • Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act
  • Uniting American Families Act
  • Universal Right to Vote by Mail Act
See also: Active Legislation, 111th Congress, via senate.gov

Vetoed

  • December 30, 2009: , a continuing appropriations resolution that became unnecessary
  • October 7, 2010: , Interstate Recognition of Notarizations Act of 2010

Treaties

  • December 22, 2010: New START (111-5)

Hearings

  • January to April 2009: Senate held confirmation hearings for Barack Obama's cabinet.
  • July 13 16, 2009: Senate Committee on the Judiciary held a hearing on Sonia Sotomayor's appointment to the United States Supreme Court.
  • June 28 30, 2010: Senate Committee on the Judiciary held a hearing on Elena Kagan's appointment to the United States Supreme Court.

Impeachments

  • : Judge Samuel B. Kent: impeached June 19, 2009[5];[6] resigned June 30, 2009 before trial;[7][8] charges dismissed July 22, 2009.[9][10]
  • : Judge Thomas Porteous: impeached March 11, 2010[11];[12] convicted December 8, 2010.[13][14]

Party summary

Resignations and new members are discussed in the "Changes in membership" section, below.

Senate

Senator Carte Goodwin (D-WV)]])

Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total |- style="height:5px"
Democratic Independent Republican Vacant
End of previous congress 48 2 49 99 1
Begin 55 2 41 98 2
January 15, 2009 56 99 1
January 20, 2009 55 98 2
January 26, 2009 56 99 1
April 30, 2009 57 40
July 7, 2009 58 100 0
August 25, 2009 57 99 1
September 9, 2009 39 98 2
September 10, 2009 40 99 1
September 25, 2009 58 100 0
February 4, 2010 57 41
June 28, 2010 56 99 1
July 16, 2010 57 100 0
November 29, 2010 56 42
Final voting share 58% 42%
Beginning of the next Congress 51 2 47 100 0

House of Representatives

Final party distribution in the House of Representatives

Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total |- style="height:5px"
Democratic Republican Vacant
End of previous congress 235 198 433 2
Begin 256 178 434 1
January 26, 2009 255 433 2
February 24, 2009 254 432 3
March 31, 2009 255 433 2
April 7, 2009 256 434 1
June 26, 2009 255 433 2
July 14, 2009 256 434 1
September 21, 2009 177 433 2
November 3, 2009 258 435 0
December 22, 2009 257 178
January 3, 2010 256 434 1
February 8, 2010 255 433 2
February 28, 2010 254 432 3
March 8, 2010 253 431 4
March 21, 2010 177 430 5
April 13, 2010 254 431 4
May 18, 2010 255 432 3
May 21, 2010 176 431 4
May 22, 2010 177 432 3
June 8, 2010 178 433 2
November 2, 2010 180 435 0
November 29, 2010 179 434 1
Final voting share 58.8% 41.2%
Non-voting members 6 0 6 0
Beginning of next Congress 193 242 435 0

Leadership

Senate

  • President
    • Dick Cheney (R), until January 20, 2009
    • Joe Biden (D), from January 20, 2009
  • President pro tempore
    • Robert Byrd (D), until June 28, 2010
    • Daniel Inouye (D), from June 28, 2010[15]

Majority (Democratic) leadership

  • Majority Leader and Conference Chairman:[16] Harry Reid
  • Assistant Majority Leader (Majority Whip): Richard Durbin
  • Conference Vice Chairman: Charles Schumer
  • Senatorial Campaign Committee Chairman: Bob Menendez
  • Conference Secretary: Patty Murray
  • Policy Committee Chairman: Byron Dorgan
  • Steering and Outreach Committee Chair: Debbie Stabenow
  • Committee Outreach Chair: Jeff Bingaman
  • Rural Outreach Chair: Blanche Lincoln
  • Chief Deputy Whip: Barbara Boxer
  • Deputy Whips: Tom Carper, Bill Nelson, and Russ Feingold

Minority (Republican) leadership

  • Minority Leader: Mitch McConnell
  • Assistant Minority Leader (Minority Whip): Jon Kyl
  • Counselor to the Minority Leader: Bob Bennett
  • Conference Chairman: Lamar Alexander
  • Conference Vice Chair
    • Lisa Murkowski,[17] until September 17, 2010[18]
    • John Barrasso, from September 22, 2010[19]
  • Policy Committee Chairman
    • John Ensign, until June 17, 2009
    • John Thune, from June 25, 2009[17]
  • National Senatorial Committee Chair: John Cornyn

House of Representatives

House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi (D)

Majority (Democratic) leadership

  • Majority Leader: Steny Hoyer
  • Majority Whip: Jim Clyburn
  • Senior Chief Deputy Majority Whip: John Lewis
  • Chief Deputy Majority Whips: Maxine Waters, John S. Tanner, Ed Pastor, Jan Schakowsky, Joseph Crowley, Diana DeGette, G.K. Butterfield, Debbie Wasserman Schultz
  • Caucus Chairman: John B. Larson
  • Caucus Vice-Chairman: Xavier Becerra
  • Campaign Committee Chairman: Chris Van Hollen
  • Steering/Policy Committee Co-Chairs: George Miller and Rosa DeLauro
  • Organization, Study, and Review Chairman: Michael Capuano

Minority (Republican) leadership

  • Minority Leader: John Boehner
  • Minority Whip: Eric Cantor
  • Chief Deputy Whip: Kevin McCarthy
  • Conference Chair: Mike Pence
  • Conference Vice-Chair: Cathy McMorris-Rodgers
  • Conference Secretary: John Carter
  • Policy Committee Chairman: Thaddeus McCotter
  • Campaign Committee Chairman: Pete Sessions

Members

Senate

Alabama

  • 3. Richard Shelby (R)
  • 2. Jeff Sessions (R)

Alaska

  • 3. Lisa Murkowski (R)
  • 2. Mark Begich (D)

Arizona

Arkansas

  • 3. Blanche Lincoln (D)
  • 2. Mark Pryor (D)

California

  • 1. Dianne Feinstein (D)
  • 3. Barbara Boxer (D)

Colorado

  • 3. Ken Salazar (D), until January 20, 2009
    • Michael Bennet (D), from January 21, 2009
  • 2. Mark Udall (D)

Connecticut

  • 3. Christopher Dodd (D)
  • 1. Joe Lieberman (ID)

Delaware

  • 2. Joe Biden (D), until January 15, 2009
    • Ted Kaufman (D), January 16, 2009 November 15, 2010
    • Chris Coons (D), from November 15, 2010
  • 1. Tom Carper (D)

Florida

  • 1. Bill Nelson (D)
  • 3. Mel Martinez (R), until September 9, 2009
    • George LeMieux (R), from September 10, 2009

Georgia

  • 2. Saxby Chambliss (R)
  • 3. Johnny Isakson (R)

Hawaii

  • 3. Daniel Inouye (D)
  • 1. Daniel Akaka (D)

Idaho

  • 3. Mike Crapo (R)
  • 2. Jim Risch (R)

Illinois

  • 2. Richard Durbin (D)
  • 3. Roland Burris (D), from January 15, 2009   November 29, 2010[20]
    • Mark Kirk (R), from November 29, 2010

Indiana

  • 1. Richard Lugar (R)
  • 3. Evan Bayh (D)

Iowa

Kansas

  • 3. Sam Brownback (R)
  • 2. Pat Roberts (R)

Kentucky

Louisiana

  • 2. Mary Landrieu (D)
  • 3. David Vitter (R)

Maine

Maryland

  • 3. Barbara Mikulski (D)
  • 1. Ben Cardin (D)

Massachusetts

  • 1. Edward M. Kennedy (D), until August 25, 2009
    • Paul G. Kirk (D), September 24, 2009 February 4, 2010
    • Scott Brown (R), from February 4, 2010
  • 2. John Kerry (D)

Michigan

  • 2. Carl Levin (D)
  • 1. Debbie Stabenow (D)

Minnesota

  • 1. Amy Klobuchar (D)
  • 2. Al Franken (D), from July 7, 2009[21]

Mississippi

  • 2. Thad Cochran (R)
  • 1. Roger Wicker (R)

Missouri

  • 3. Kit Bond (R)
  • 1. Claire McCaskill (D)

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

  • 3. Harry Reid (D)
  • 1. John Ensign (R)

New Hampshire

  • 3. Judd Gregg (R)
  • 2. Jeanne Shaheen (D)

New Jersey

  • 2. Frank Lautenberg (D)
  • 1. Bob Menendez (D)

New Mexico

New York

  • 3. Chuck Schumer (D)
  • 1. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D), until January 21, 2009
    • Kirsten Gillibrand (D), from January 26, 2009

North Carolina

  • 3. Richard Burr (R)
  • 2. Kay Hagan (D)

North Dakota

Ohio

  • 3. George Voinovich (R)
  • 1. Sherrod Brown (D)

Oklahoma

  • 2. Jim Inhofe (R)
  • 3. Tom Coburn (R)

Oregon

Pennsylvania

  • 3. Arlen Specter (R) until April 29, 2009, then (D)[22]
  • 1. Bob Casey (D)

Rhode Island

  • 2. Jack Reed (D)
  • 1. Sheldon Whitehouse (D)

South Carolina

South Dakota

  • 2. Tim Johnson (D)
  • 3. John Thune (R)

Tennessee

  • 2. Lamar Alexander (R)
  • 1. Bob Corker (R)

Texas

  • 1. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R)
  • 2. John Cornyn (R)

Utah

  • 1. Orrin Hatch (R)
  • 3. Bob Bennett (R)

Vermont

  • 3. Patrick Leahy (D)
  • 1. Bernie Sanders (I)

Virginia

  • 1. Jim Webb (D)
  • 2. Mark Warner (D)

Washington

  • 3. Patty Murray (D)
  • 1. Maria Cantwell (D)

West Virginia

  • 1. Robert Byrd (D), until June 28, 2010
    • Carte Goodwin (D), July 16, 2010 November 15, 2010[23]
    • Joe Manchin (D), from November 15, 2010
  • 2. Jay Rockefeller (D)

Wisconsin

  • 1. Herb Kohl (D)
  • 3. Russ Feingold (D)

Wyoming

  • 2. Michael Enzi (R)
  • 1. John Barrasso (R)

Massachusetts special election]]); final party composition before the 2010 mid-term elections 1 Independent and 1 Democrat Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid (D) Senate Minority Leader
Mitch McConnell (R) Senate Majority Whip
Dick Durbin (D) Senate Minority Whip
Jon Kyl (R)

House of Representatives

Alabama

(3 Democrats, 4 Republicans; then 2 Democrats, 5 Republicans)

  • . Jo Bonner (R)
  • . Bobby Bright (D)
  • . Mike Rogers (R)
  • . Robert Aderholt (R)
  • . Parker Griffith (D then R)[24]
  • . Spencer Bachus (R)
  • . Artur Davis (D)

Alaska

(1 Republican)

  • . Don Young (R)

Arizona

(5 Democrats, 3 Republicans)

  • . Ann Kirkpatrick (D)
  • . Trent Franks (R)
  • . John Shadegg (R)
  • . Ed Pastor (D)
  • . Harry Mitchell (D)
  • . Jeff Flake (R)
  • . Raul Grijalva (D)
  • . Gabrielle Giffords (D)

Arkansas

(3 Democrats, 1 Republican)

  • . Marion Berry (D)
  • . Vic Snyder (D)
  • . John Boozman (R)
  • . Mike Ross (D)

California

(34 Democrats, 19 Republicans)

  • . Mike Thompson (D)
  • . Wally Herger (R)
  • . Dan Lungren (R)
  • . Tom McClintock (R)
  • . Doris Matsui (D)
  • . Lynn Woolsey (D)
  • . George Miller (D)
  • . Nancy Pelosi (D)
  • . Barbara Lee (D)
  • . Ellen Tauscher (D), until June 26, 2009
    • John Garamendi (D), from November 3, 2009
  • . Jerry McNerney (D)
  • . Jackie Speier (D)
  • . Pete Stark (D)
  • . Anna Eshoo (D)
  • . Mike Honda (D)
  • . Zoe Lofgren (D)
  • . Sam Farr (D)
  • . Dennis Cardoza (D)
  • . George Radanovich (R)
  • . Jim Costa (D)
  • . Devin Nunes (R)
  • . Kevin McCarthy (R)
  • . Lois Capps (D)
  • . Elton Gallegly (R)
  • . Howard McKeon (R)
  • . David Dreier (R)
  • . Brad Sherman (D)
  • . Howard Berman (D)
  • . Adam Schiff (D)
  • . Henry Waxman (D)
  • . Xavier Becerra (D)
  • . Hilda Solis (D), until February 24, 2009
    • Judy Chu (D), from July 14, 2009
  • . Diane Watson (D)
  • . Lucille Roybal-Allard (D)
  • . Maxine Waters (D)
  • . Jane Harman (D)
  • . Laura Richardson (D)
  • . Grace Napolitano (D)
  • . Linda Sanchez (D)
  • . Ed Royce (R)
  • . Jerry Lewis (R)
  • . Gary Miller (R)
  • . Joe Baca (D)
  • . Ken Calvert (R)
  • . Mary Bono Mack (R)
  • . Dana Rohrabacher (R)
  • . Loretta Sanchez (D)
  • . John Campbell (R)
  • . Darrell Issa (R)
  • . Brian Bilbray (R)
  • . Bob Filner (D)
  • . Duncan Hunter (R)
  • . Susan Davis (D)

Colorado

(5 Democrats, 2 Republicans)

  • . Diana DeGette (D)
  • . Jared Polis (D)
  • . John Salazar (D)
  • . Betsy Markey (D)
  • . Doug Lamborn (R)
  • . Mike Coffman (R)
  • . Ed Perlmutter (D)

Connecticut

(5 Democrats)

  • . John Larson (D)
  • . Joe Courtney (D)
  • . Rosa DeLauro (D)
  • . Jim Himes (D)
  • . Chris Murphy (D)

Delaware

(1 Republican)

  • . Michael Castle (R)

Florida

(10 Democrats, 15 Republicans)

  • . Jeff Miller (R)
  • . Allen Boyd (D)
  • . Corrine Brown (D)
  • . Ander Crenshaw (R)
  • . Ginny Brown-Waite (R)
  • . Cliff Stearns (R)
  • . John Mica (R)
  • . Alan Grayson (D)
  • . Gus Bilirakis (R)
  • . Bill Young (R)
  • . Kathy Castor (D)
  • . Adam Putnam (R)
  • . Vern Buchanan (R)
  • . Connie Mack (R)
  • . Bill Posey (R)
  • . Tom Rooney (R)
  • . Kendrick Meek (D)
  • . Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R)
  • . Robert Wexler (D), until January 3, 2010[25]
    • Ted Deutch (D), from April 13, 2010
  • . Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D)
  • . Lincoln Diaz-Balart (R)
  • . Ron Klein (D)
  • . Alcee Hastings (D)
  • . Suzanne Kosmas (D)
  • . Mario Diaz-Balart (R)

Georgia

(6 Democrats, 7 Republicans)

  • . Jack Kingston (R)
  • . Sanford Bishop (D)
  • . Lynn Westmoreland (R)
  • . Hank Johnson (D)
  • . John Lewis (D)
  • . Tom Price (R)
  • . John Linder (R)
  • . Jim Marshall (D)
  • . Nathan Deal (R), until March 21, 2010
    • Tom Graves (R), from June 8, 2010
  • . Paul Broun (R)
  • . Phil Gingrey (R)
  • . John Barrow (D)
  • . David Scott (D)

Hawaii

(1 Democrat, 1 Republican)

  • . Neil Abercrombie (D), until February 28, 2010
    • Charles Djou (R), from May 22, 2010
  • . Mazie Hirono (D)

Idaho

(1 Democrat, 1 Republican)

  • . Walt Minnick (D)
  • . Michael Simpson (R)

Illinois

(12 Democrats, 7 Republicans)

  • . Bobby Rush (D)
  • . Jesse Jackson (D)
  • . Dan Lipinski (D)
  • . Luis Gutierrez (D)
  • . Michael Quigley (D), from April 7, 2009
  • . Peter Roskam (R)
  • . Danny Davis (D)
  • . Melissa Bean (D)
  • . Jan Schakowsky (D)
  • . Mark Kirk (R), until November 29, 2010, vacant thereafter
  • . Debbie Halvorson (D)
  • . Jerry Costello (D)
  • . Judy Biggert (R)
  • . Bill Foster (D)
  • . Tim Johnson (R)
  • . Donald Manzullo (R)
  • . Phil Hare (D)
  • . Aaron Schock (R)
  • . John Shimkus (R)

Indiana

(5 Democrats, 4 Republicans)

  • . Pete Visclosky (D)
  • . Joe Donnelly (D)
  • . Mark Souder (R), until May 21, 2010
    • Marlin Stutzman (R), from November 2, 2010
  • . Steve Buyer (R)
  • . Dan Burton (R)
  • . Mike Pence (R)
  • . Andre Carson (D)
  • . Brad Ellsworth (D)
  • . Baron Hill (D)

Iowa

(3 Democrats, 2 Republicans)

  • . Bruce Braley (D)
  • . David Loebsack (D)
  • . Leonard Boswell (D)
  • . Tom Latham (R)
  • . Steve King (R)

Kansas

(1 Democrat, 3 Republicans)

  • . Jerry Moran (R)
  • . Lynn Jenkins (R)
  • . Dennis Moore (D)
  • . Todd Tiahrt (R)

Kentucky

(2 Democrats, 4 Republicans)

  • . Ed Whitfield (R)
  • . Brett Guthrie (R)
  • . John Yarmuth (D)
  • . Geoff Davis (R)
  • . Harold Rogers (R)
  • . Ben Chandler (D)

Louisiana

(1 Democrat, 6 Republicans)

  • . Steve Scalise (R)
  • . Joseph Cao (R)
  • . Charlie Melancon (D)
  • . John Fleming (R)
  • . Rodney Alexander (R)
  • . Bill Cassidy (R)
  • . Charles Boustany (R)

Maine

(2 Democrats)

  • . Chellie Pingree (D)
  • . Mike Michaud (D)

Maryland

(7 Democrats, 1 Republican)

  • . Frank Kratovil (D)
  • . Dutch Ruppersberger (D)
  • . John Sarbanes (D)
  • . Donna Edwards (D)
  • . Steny Hoyer (D)
  • . Roscoe Bartlett (R)
  • . Elijah Cummings (D)
  • . Chris Van Hollen (D)

Massachusetts

(10 Democrats)

  • . John Olver (D)
  • . Richard Neal (D)
  • . Jim McGovern (D)
  • . Barney Frank (D)
  • . Niki Tsongas (D)
  • . John Tierney (D)
  • . Ed Markey (D)
  • . Mike Capuano (D)
  • . Stephen Lynch (D)
  • . Bill Delahunt (D)

Michigan

(8 Democrats, 7 Republicans)

  • . Bart Stupak (D)
  • . Peter Hoekstra (R)
  • . Vern Ehlers (R)
  • . David Camp (R)
  • . Dale Kildee (D)
  • . Fred Upton (R)
  • . Mark Schauer (D)
  • . Mike Rogers (R)
  • . Gary Peters (D)
  • . Candice Miller (R)
  • . Thaddeus McCotter (R)
  • . Sander Levin (D)
  • . Carolyn Cheeks (D)
  • . John Conyers (D)
  • . John Dingell (D)

Minnesota

(5 Democrats, 3 Republicans)

  • . Tim Walz (DFL)
  • . John Kline (R)
  • . Erik Paulsen (R)
  • . Betty McCollum (DFL)
  • . Keith Ellison (DFL)
  • . Michele Bachmann (R)
  • . Collin Peterson (DFL)
  • . Jim Oberstar (DFL)

Mississippi

(3 Democrats, 1 Republican)

  • . Travis Childers (D)
  • . Bennie Thompson (D)
  • . Gregg Harper (R)
  • . Gene Taylor (D)

Missouri

(4 Democrats, 5 Republicans)

  • . William Clay (D)
  • . Todd Akin (R)
  • . Russ Carnahan (D)
  • . Ike Skelton (D)
  • . Emanuel Cleaver (D)
  • . Sam Graves (R)
  • . Roy Blunt (R)
  • . Jo Ann Emerson (R)
  • . Blaine Luetkemeyer (R)

Montana

(1 Republican)

  • . Denny Rehberg (R)

Nebraska

(3 Republicans)

  • . Jeff Fortenberry (R)
  • . Lee Terry (R)
  • . Adrian Smith (R)

Nevada

(2 Democrats, 1 Republican)

  • . Shelley Berkley (D)
  • . Dean Heller (R)
  • . Dina Titus (D)

New Hampshire

(2 Democrats)

  • . Carol Shea-Porter (D)
  • . Paul Hodes (D)

New Jersey

(8 Democrats, 5 Republicans)

  • . Rob Andrews (D)
  • . Frank LoBiondo (R)
  • . John Adler (D)
  • . Chris Smith (R)
  • . Scott Garrett (R)
  • . Frank Pallone (D)
  • . Leonard Lance (R)
  • . Bill Pascrell (D)
  • . Steve Rothman (D)
  • . Donald Payne (D)
  • . Rodney Frelinghuysen (R)
  • . Rush Holt (D)
  • . Albio Sires (D)

New Mexico

(3 Democrats)

  • . Martin Heinrich (D)
  • . Harry Teague (D)
  • . Ben Lujan (D)

New York

(26 Democrats, 3 Republicans)

  • . Tim Bishop (D)
  • . Steve Israel (D)
  • . Peter King (R)
  • . Carolyn McCarthy (D)
  • . Gary Ackerman (D)
  • . Gregory Meeks (D)
  • . Joseph Crowley (D)
  • . Jerrold Nadler (D)
  • . Anthony Weiner (D)
  • . Ed Towns (D)
  • . Yvette Clarke (D)
  • . Nydia Vel zquez (D)
  • . Michael McMahon (D)
  • . Carolyn Maloney (D)
  • . Charles Rangel (D)
  • . Jose Serrano (D)
  • . Eliot L. Engel (D)
  • . Nita Lowey (D)
  • . John Hall (D)
  • . Kirsten Gillibrand (D), until January 26, 2009
    • Scott Murphy (D), from April 29, 2009
  • . Paul Tonko (D)
  • . Maurice Hinchey (D)
  • . John McHugh (R), until September 21, 2009
    • Bill Owens (D), from November 6, 2009
  • . Mike Arcuri (D)
  • . Dan Maffei (D)
  • . Chris Lee (R)
  • . Brian Higgins (D)
  • . Louise Slaughter (D)
  • . Eric Massa (D), until March 8, 2010
    • Tom Reed (R),from November 2, 2010

North Carolina

(8 Democrats, 5 Republicans)

  • . G. K. Butterfield (D)
  • . Bob Etheridge (D)
  • . Walter Jones (R)
  • . David Price (D)
  • . Virginia Foxx (R)
  • . Howard Coble (R)
  • . Mike McIntyre (D)
  • . Larry Kissell (D)
  • . Sue Myrick (R)
  • . Patrick McHenry (R)
  • . Heath Shuler (D)
  • . Mel Watt (D)
  • . Brad Miller (D)

North Dakota

(1 Democrat)

  • . Earl Pomeroy (D)

Ohio

(10 Democrats, 8 Republicans)

  • . Steve Driehaus (D)
  • . Jean Schmidt (R)
  • . Mike Turner (R)
  • . Jim Jordan (R)
  • . Bob Latta (R)
  • . Charlie Wilson (D)
  • . Steve Austria (R)
  • . John Boehner (R)
  • . Marcy Kaptur (D)
  • . Dennis Kucinich (D)
  • . Marcia Fudge (D)
  • . Pat Tiberi (R)
  • . Betty Sutton (D)
  • . Steve LaTourette (R)
  • . Mary Kilroy (D)
  • . John Boccieri (D)
  • . Tim Ryan (D)
  • . Zack Space (D)

Oklahoma

(1 Democrat, 4 Republicans)

  • . John Sullivan (R)
  • . Dan Boren (D)
  • . Frank Lucas (R)
  • . Tom Cole (R)
  • . Mary Fallin (R)

Oregon

(4 Democrats, 1 Republican)

  • . David Wu (D)
  • . Greg Walden (R)
  • . Earl Blumenauer (D)
  • . Peter DeFazio (D)
  • . Kurt Schrader (D)

Pennsylvania

(12 Democrats, 7 Republicans)

  • . Bob Brady (D)
  • . Chaka Fattah (D)
  • . Kathy Dahlkemper (D)
  • . Jason Altmire (D)
  • . Glenn Thompson (R)
  • . Jim Gerlach (R)
  • . Joe Sestak (D)
  • . Patrick Murphy (D)
  • . Bill Shuster (R)
  • . Chris Carney (D)
  • . Paul Kanjorski (D)
  • . John Murtha (D), until February 8, 2010[26]
    • Mark Critz (D), from May 18, 2010
  • . Allyson Schwartz (D)
  • . Michael Doyle (D)
  • . Charlie Dent (R)
  • . Joseph Pitts (R)
  • . Tim Holden (D)
  • . Tim Murphy (R)
  • . Todd Platts (R)

Rhode Island

(2 Democrats)

  • . Patrick Kennedy (D)
  • . James Langevin (D)

South Carolina

(2 Democrats, 4 Republicans)

  • . Henry Brown (R)
  • . Joe Wilson (R)
  • . Gresham Barrett (R)
  • . Bob Inglis (R)
  • . John Spratt (D)
  • . Jim Clyburn (D)

South Dakota

(1 Democrat)

  • . Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (D)

Tennessee

(5 Democrats, 4 Republicans)

  • . Phil Roe (R)
  • . John Duncan (R)
  • . Zach Wamp (R)
  • . Lincoln Davis (D)
  • . Jim Cooper (D)
  • . Bart Gordon (D)
  • . Marsha Blackburn (R)
  • . John Tanner (D)
  • . Steve Cohen (D)

Texas

(12 Democrats, 20 Republicans)

  • . Louie Gohmert (R)
  • . Ted Poe (R)
  • . Sam Johnson (R)
  • . Ralph Hall (R)
  • . Jeb Hensarling (R)
  • . Joe Barton (R)
  • . John Culberson (R)
  • . Kevin Brady (R)
  • . Al Green (D)
  • . Michael McCaul (R)
  • . Mike Conaway (R)
  • . Kay Granger (R)
  • . Mac Thornberry (R)
  • . Ron Paul (R)
  • . Ruben Hinojosa (D)
  • . Silvestre Reyes (D)
  • . Chet Edwards (D)
  • . Sheila Jackson Lee (D)
  • . Randy Neugebauer (R)
  • . Charlie Gonzalez (D)
  • . Lamar Smith (R)
  • . Pete Olson (R)
  • . Ciro Rodriguez (D)
  • . Kenny Marchant (R)
  • . Lloyd Doggett (D)
  • . Michael Burgess (R)
  • . Solomon Ortiz (D)
  • . Henry Cuellar (D)
  • . Gene Green (D)
  • . Bernice Johnson (D)
  • . John Carter (R)
  • . Pete Sessions (R)

Utah

(1 Democrat, 2 Republicans)

  • . Rob Bishop (R)
  • . Jim Matheson (D)
  • . Jason Chaffetz (R)

Vermont

(1 Democrat)

  • . Peter Welch (D)

Virginia

(6 Democrats, 5 Republicans)

  • . Rob Wittman (R)
  • . Glenn Nye (D)
  • . Bobby Scott (D)
  • . Randy Forbes (R)
  • . Tom Perriello (D)
  • . Bob Goodlatte (R)
  • . Eric Cantor (R)
  • . Jim Moran (D)
  • . Rick Boucher (D)
  • . Frank Wolf (R)
  • . Gerry Connolly (D)

Washington

(6 Democrats, 3 Republicans)

  • . Jay Inslee (D)
  • . Rick Larsen (D)
  • . Brian Baird (D)
  • . Doc Hastings (R)
  • . Cathy Rodgers (R)
  • . Norm Dicks (D)
  • . Jim McDermott (D)
  • . Dave Reichert (R)
  • . Adam Smith (D)

West Virginia

(2 Democrats, 1 Republican)

  • . Alan Mollohan (D)
  • . Shelley Moore Capito (R)
  • . Nick Rahall (D)

Wisconsin

(5 Democrats, 3 Republicans)

  • . Paul Ryan (R)
  • . Tammy Baldwin (D)
  • . Ron Kind (D)
  • . Gwen Moore (D)
  • . Jim Sensenbrenner (R)
  • . Tom Petri (R)
  • . Dave Obey (D)
  • . Steve Kagen (D)

Wyoming

(1 Republican)

  • . Cynthia Lummis (R)

Non-voting members

  • . Eni Faleomavaega (D)
  • . Eleanor Holmes Norton (D)
  • . Madeleine Bordallo (D)
  • . Gregorio C. Sablan (I, then D)[27]
  • . Pedro Pierluisi (D and PNP)
  • . Donna Christian-Christensen (D)

Percentage of members from each party by state at the opening of the 111th Congress in January 2009, ranging from dark blue (most Democratic) to dark red (most Republican). Members' party membership by district, as of May 25, 2010
House Majority Leader
Steny Hoyer (D) House Minority Leader
John Boehner (R) House Majority Whip
Jim Clyburn (D) House Minority Whip
Eric Cantor (R)

Changes in membership

Senate

longest-serving senator]] and the longest-serving member in the history of Congress.[28][29] Four of the changes are associated with the 2008 presidential election and appointments to the Obama Administration, one senator changed parties, one election was disputed, two senators died, one senator resigned, and three appointed senators served only until special elections were held during this Congress. |- | Minnesota
(2) | Disputed | style="font-size:80%" | Incumbent Norm Coleman (R) challenged the election of Al Franken (D). The results were disputed, and the seat remained vacant at the beginning of the Congress. Following recounts and litigation, Coleman conceded, and Franken was seated. | nowrap | Al Franken
(D) | July 7, 2009[30] |- | Illinois
(3) | Vacant | style="font-size:80%" | Barack Obama (D) resigned near the end of the previous Congress, after being elected President of the United States.[31] His successor was appointed December 31, 2008, during the last Congress, but due to a credentials challenge, his credentials were not deemed "in order" until January 12, and he was not sworn in to fill his seat until 12 days after the initiation of this Congress.[32] The appointed successor filled the seat until a special election was held November 2, 2010. | nowrap | Roland Burris[33]
(D) | January 12, 2009[32] |- | Delaware
(2) | nowrap | Joe Biden
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned January 15, 2009, to assume the position of Vice President.[34]
The appointed successor held the seat until a special election was held November 2, 2010. | nowrap | Ted Kaufman[35]
(D) | January 16, 2009[36] |- | Colorado
(3) | nowrap | Ken Salazar
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned January 20, 2009, to become Secretary of the Interior.
The appointed successor held the seat for the remainder of the term that ends with this Congress. | nowrap | Michael Bennet[37]
(D) | January 21, 2009[38] |- | New York
(1) | nowrap | Hillary Clinton
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned January 21, 2009, to become Secretary of State.
The appointed successor held the seat until a special election was held November 2, 2010. | nowrap | Kirsten Gillibrand[39]
(D) | January 26, 2009 |- | Pennsylvania
(3) | nowrap | Arlen Specter
(R) | style="font-size:80%" | Changed party affiliation April 30, 2009.[22] | nowrap | Arlen Specter
(D) | April 30, 2009 |- | Massachusetts
(1) | nowrap | Ted Kennedy
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Died August 25, 2009.
The appointed successor held the seat until the elected successor took the seat.[40][41][42] | nowrap | Paul G. Kirk
(D) | September 25, 2009 |- | Florida
(3) | nowrap | Mel Martinez
(R) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned September 9, 2009, for personal reasons.[43]
The appointed successor held the seat for the remainder of the term that ends with this Congress. | nowrap | George LeMieux
(R) | September 10, 2009[44][45] |- | Massachusetts
(1) | nowrap | Paul G. Kirk
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Appointed February 4, 2010. The appointment lasted only until his elected successor was seated.[46]
The winner of the special election held the seat for the remainder of the term that ends January 3, 2013. | nowrap | Scott Brown
(R)[47] | February 4, 2010 |- | West Virginia
(1) | nowrap | Robert Byrd
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Died June 28, 2010.[48]
The appointed successor held the seat until a special election was held November 2, 2010.[49] | nowrap | Carte Goodwin
(D)[23] | July 16, 2010[50] |- | Delaware
(2) | nowrap | Ted Kaufman
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Appointed January 15, 2009. The appointment lasted only until the November 2, 2010 special election, in which he was not a candidate.[51]
The winner of the special election held the seat for the remainder of the term that ends January 3, 2015. | nowrap | Chris Coons
(D) | November 15, 2010[52][53] |- | West Virginia
(1) | nowrap | Carte Goodwin
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Appointed November 15, 2010. The appointment lasted only until the November 2, 2010 special election, in which he was not a candidate.
The winner of the special election held the seat for the remainder of the term that ends January 3, 2013. | nowrap | Joe Manchin
(D) | November 15, 2010[52][53] |- | Illinois
(3) | nowrap | Roland Burris
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Appointed November 29, 2010. The appointment lasted only until the November 2, 2010 special election, in which he was not a candidate.
The winner of the special election held the seat for the remainder of the term that ended with this Congress. | nowrap | Mark Kirk
(R) | November 29, 2010[52][53] |}

House of Representatives

Five changes are associated with appointments to the Obama Administration, four directly and one indirectly. Two representatives changed parties, one died, and five resigned. House vacancies are only filled by elections. State laws regulate when (and if) there will be special elections. |- | | Vacant | style="font-size:80%" | Rahm Emanuel (D) resigned near the end of the previous Congress after being named White House Chief of Staff.
A special election was held April 7, 2009 | | Michael Quigley
(D) | April 7, 2009 |- | | | Kirsten Gillibrand
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned January 26, 2009, when appointed to the Senate, replacing Hillary Clinton who became Secretary of State.
A special election was held March 31, 2009. | | Scott Murphy
(D) | March 31, 2009 |- | Northern Mariana Islands At-large | | Gregorio Sablan
(I) | style="font-size:80%" |Changed party affiliation February 23, 2009.[27]
Previously an Independent who caucused with Democrats in House | | Gregorio Sablan
(D) | February 23, 2009 |- | | | Hilda Solis
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned February 24, 2009, to become Secretary of Labor.
A special election was held July 14, 2009. | | Judy Chu
(D) | July 14, 2009 |- | | | Ellen Tauscher
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned June 26, 2009, to become Undersecretary of State for Arms Control and International Security.
A special election was held November 3, 2009. | | John Garamendi
(D)[54] | November 3, 2009[55] |- | | | John M. McHugh
(R) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned September 21, 2009, to become Secretary of the Army.[56]
A special election was held November 3, 2009. | | Bill Owens
(D)[57] | November 3, 2009 |- | | | Parker Griffith
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Changed party affiliation December 22, 2009.[58] | | Parker Griffith
(R) | December 22, 2009 |- | | | Robert Wexler
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned January 3, 2010, to become president of the Center for Middle East Peace & Economic Cooperation.[59]
A special election was held April 13, 2010. | | Ted Deutch (D) | April 13, 2010 |- | | | John Murtha
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Died February 8, 2010.
A special election was held May 18, 2010. | | Mark Critz (D) | May 18, 2010 |- | | | Neil Abercrombie
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned February 28, 2010,[60] to focus on run for Governor of Hawaii.
A special election was held May 22, 2010. | | Charles Djou (R) | May 22, 2010 |- | | | Eric Massa
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned March 8, 2010,[61] due to a recurrence of his cancer, as well as an ethics investigation.
A special election was held contemporaneously with the November 2, 2010 general election. | | Tom Reed (R) | November 2, 2010[53][62] |- | | | Nathan Deal
(R) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned March 21, 2010, to focus on run for Governor of Georgia.
A special election runoff was held June 8, 2010. | | Tom Graves (R) | June 8, 2010 |- | | | Mark Souder
(R) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned May 21, 2010, after an affair with a staff member was revealed.[63]
A special election was held contemporaneously with the November 2, 2010 general election.[64] | | Marlin Stutzman (R) | November 2, 2010[53] |- | | | Mark Kirk
(R) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned November 29, 2010, after being elected to the United States Senate in a special election | colspan=2 | Vacant until the next Congress |}

Committees

Lists of committees and their party leaders.

Senate

  • Aging (Special) (Herb Kohl, Chair; Bob Corker, Vice Chair)
  • Agriculture (Blanche Lincoln, Chair; Saxby Chambliss, Ranking)
    • Domestic and Foreign Marketing, Inspection, and Plant and Animal Health (Kirsten Gillibrand, Chair; Mike Johanns, Ranking)
    • Energy, Science and Technology (Michael Bennet, Chair; John Thune, Ranking)
    • Hunger, Nutrition and Family Farms (Sherrod Brown, Chair; Richard Lugar, Ranking)
    • Production, Income Protection and Price Support (Bob Casey, Chair; Pat Roberts, Ranking)
    • Rural Revitalization, Conservation, Forestry and Credit (Debbie Stabenow, Chair; Mike Crapo, Ranking)
  • Appropriations (Daniel Inouye, Chair; Thad Cochran, Ranking)
    • Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies (Herb Kohl, Chair; Sam Brownback, Ranking)
    • Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies (Barbara Mikulski, Chair; Richard Shelby, Ranking)
    • Defense (Daniel Inouye, Chair; Thad Cochran, Ranking)
    • Energy and Water Development (Byron Dorgan, Chair; politician)|Bob Bennett]], Ranking)
    • Financial Services and General Government (Richard Durbin, Chair; Susan Collins, Ranking)
    • Homeland Security (Frank Lautenberg, Chair; George Voinovich, Ranking)
    • Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies (Dianne Feinstein, Chair; Lamar Alexander, Ranking)
    • Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (Tom Harkin, Chair; , Ranking)
    • Legislative Branch (Ben Nelson, Chair; Lisa Murkowski, Ranking)
    • Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies (Tim Johnson, Chair; Kay Bailey Hutchison, Ranking)
    • State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs (Patrick Leahy, Chair; Judd Gregg, Ranking)
    • Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies (Patty Murray, Chair; Kit Bond, Ranking)
  • Armed Services (Carl Levin, Chair; John McCain, Ranking)
    • Airland (Joe Lieberman, Chair; John Thune, Ranking)
    • Emerging Threats and Capabilities (Bill Nelson, Chair; George LeMieux, Ranking)
    • Personnel (Jim Webb, Chair; Lindsey Graham, Ranking)
    • Readiness and Management Support (Evan Bayh, Chair; Richard Burr, Ranking)
    • SeaPower (Jack Reed, Chair; Roger Wicker, Ranking)
    • Strategic Forces (Ben Nelson, Chair; David Vitter, Ranking)
  • Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs (Christopher Dodd, Chair; Richard Shelby, Ranking)
    • Economic Policy (Sherrod Brown, Chair; Jim DeMint, Ranking)
    • Financial Institutions (Tim Johnson, Chair; Mike Crapo, Ranking)
    • Housing, Transportation, and Community Development (Robert Menendez, Chair; David Vitter, Ranking)
    • Securities, Insurance, and Investment (Jack Reed, Chair; Jim Bunning, Ranking)
    • Security and International Trade and Finance (Evan Bayh, Chair; Bob Corker, Ranking)
  • Budget (Kent Conrad, Chair; Judd Gregg, Ranking)
  • Commerce, Science and Transportation (Jay Rockefeller, Chair; Kay Bailey Hutchison, Ranking)
    • Aviation Operations, Safety, and Security (Byron Dorgan, Chair; Jim DeMint, Ranking)
    • Communications and Technology (John Kerry, Chair; John Ensign, Ranking)
    • Competitiveness, Innovation, and Export Promotion (Amy Klobuchar, Chair; George LeMieux, Ranking)
    • Consumer Protection, Product Safety, and Insurance (Mark Pryor, Chair; Roger Wicker, Ranking)
    • Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries, and Coast Guard (Maria Cantwell, Chair; Olympia Snowe, Ranking)
    • Science and Space (Bill Nelson, Chair; David Vitter, Ranking)
    • Surface Transportation and Merchant Marine Infrastructure, Safety, and Security (Frank Lautenberg, Chair; John Thune, Ranking)
  • Energy and Natural Resources (Jeff Bingaman, Chair; Lisa Murkowski, Ranking)
    • Energy (Maria Cantwell, Chair; Jim Risch, Ranking)
    • National Parks (Mark Udall, Chair; Richard Burr, Ranking)
    • Public Lands and Forests (Ron Wyden, Chair; John Barrasso, Ranking)
    • Water and Power (Debbie Stabenow, Chair; Sam Brownback, Ranking)
  • Environment and Public Works (Barbara Boxer, Chair; Jim Inhofe, Ranking)
    • Children s Health (Amy Klobuchar, Chair; Lamar Alexander, Ranking)
    • Clean Air and Nuclear Safety (Tom Carper, Chair; David Vitter, Ranking)
    • Green Jobs and the New Economy (Bernie Sanders, Chair; Kit Bond, Ranking)
    • Oversight (Sheldon Whitehouse, Chair; John Barrasso, Ranking)
    • Superfund, Toxics and Environmental Health (Frank Lautenberg, Chair; Jim Inhofe, Ranking)
    • Transportation and Infrastructure (Max Baucus, Chair; George Voinovich, Ranking)
    • Water and Wildlife (Ben Cardin, Chair; Mike Crapo, Ranking)
  • Select Committee on Ethics (Barbara Boxer, Chair; Johnny Isakson, Vice Chair)
  • Finance (Max Baucus, Chair; Charles Grassley, Ranking)
    • Energy, Natural Resources, and Infrastructure (Jeff Bingaman, Chair; Jim Bunning, Ranking)
    • Health Care (John D. Rockefeller IV, Chair; Orrin Hatch, Ranking)
    • International Trade and Global Competitiveness (Ron Wyden, Chair; Mike Crapo, Ranking)
    • Social Security, Pensions, and Family Policy (Blanche Lincoln, Chair; Pat Roberts, Ranking)
    • Taxation, IRS Oversight, and Long-Term Growth (Kent Conrad, Chair; Jon Kyl, Ranking)
  • Foreign Relations (John Kerry, Chair; Richard Lugar, Ranking)
    • African Affairs (Russ Feingold, Chair; Johnny Isakson, Ranking)
    • East Asian and Pacific Affairs (Jim Webb, Chair; Jim Inhofe, Ranking)
    • European Affairs (Jeanne Shaheen, Chair; Jim DeMint, Ranking)
    • International Development and Foreign Assistance, Economic Affairs, and International Environmental Protection (Robert Menendez, Chair; Bob Corker, Ranking)
    • International Operations and Organizations, Human Rights, Democracy and Global Women's Issues (Barbara Boxer, Chair; Roger Wicker, Ranking)
    • Near Eastern and South and Central Asian Affairs (Bob Casey, Chair; Jim Risch, Ranking)
    • Western Hemisphere, Peace Corps and Narcotics Affairs (Chris Dodd, Chair; John Barrasso, Ranking)
  • Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (Tom Harkin, Chair; Mike Enzi, Ranking)
    • Children and Families (Chris Dodd, Chair; Lamar Alexander, Ranking)
    • Employment and Workplace Safety (Patty Murray, Chair; Johnny Isakson, Ranking)
    • Retirement and Aging (Barbara Mikulski, Chair; Richard Burr, Ranking)
  • Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs (Joe Lieberman, Chair; Susan Collins, Ranking)
    • Contracting Oversight (Ad Hoc) (Claire McCaskill, Chair; Susan Collins Ranking)
    • (Disaster Recovery (Ad Hoc) (Mary Landrieu, Chair; Lindsey Graham, Ranking)
    • Federal Financial Management, Government Information and International Security (Tom Carper, Chair; John McCain, Ranking)
    • Oversight of Government Management, the Federal Workforce and the District of Columbia (Daniel Akaka, Chair; George Voinovich, Ranking)
    • Investigations (Permanent) (Carl Levin, Chair; Tom Coburn, Ranking)
    • State, Local, and Private Sector Preparedness and Integration (Ad Hoc) (Mark Pryor, Chair; John Ensign, Ranking)
  • Impeachment Trial Committee (Kent) (Claire McCaskill, Chair; Mel Martinez, Vice Chair)[65]
  • Impeachment Trial Committee (Porteous) (Claire McCaskill, Chair; Orrin Hatch, Vice Chair)[66]
  • Indian Affairs[67] (Byron Dorgan, Chair; John Barrasso, Vice Chair)
  • Intelligence (Select) (Dianne Feinstein, Chair; Kit Bond, Vice Chair)
  • International Narcotics Control[68] (Dianne Feinstein, Chair; Chuck Grassley, Co-chairman)
  • Judiciary (Patrick Leahy, Chair; Jeff Sessions, Ranking)
    • Administrative Oversight and the Courts (Sheldon Whitehouse, Chair; Jeff Sessions, Ranking)
    • Antitrust, Competition Policy and Consumer Rights (Herb Kohl, Chair; Orrin Hatch, Ranking)
    • The Constitution (Russ Feingold, Chair; Tom Coburn, Ranking)
    • Crime and Drugs (Arlen Specter, Chair; Lindsay Graham, Ranking)
    • Human Rights and the Law (Dick Durbin, Chair; Tom Coburn, Ranking)
    • Immigration, Refugees, and Border Security (Chuck Schumer, Chair; John Cornyn, Ranking)
    • Terrorism and Homeland Security (Ben Cardin, Chair; Jon Kyl, Ranking)
  • Rules and Administration (Chuck Schumer, Chair; politician)|Bob Bennett]], Ranking)
  • Small Business and Entrepreneurship (Mary Landrieu, Chair; Olympia Snowe, Ranking)
  • Veterans' Affairs (Daniel Akaka, Chair; Richard Burr, Ranking)

House of Representatives

  • Agriculture (Collin C. Peterson, Chair; politician)|Frank Lucas]], Ranking)
    • Conservation, Credit, Energy, and Research (Tim Holden, Chair; Bob Goodlatte, Ranking)
    • Department Operations, Oversight, Nutrition and Forestry (Joe Baca, Chair; Jeff Fortenberry, Ranking)
    • General Farm Commodities and Risk Management (Leonard Boswell, Chair; Jerry Moran, Ranking)
    • Horticulture and Organic Agriculture (Dennis Cardoza, Chair; Jean Schmidt, Ranking)
    • Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry (David Scott, Chair; Randy Neugebauer, Ranking)
    • Specialty Crops, Rural Development and Foreign Agriculture (Mike McIntyre, Chair; Mike Conaway, Ranking)
  • Appropriations (David Obey, Chair; California politician)|Jerry Lewis]], Ranking)
    • Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies (Rosa DeLauro, Chair; Jack Kingston, Ranking)
    • Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies (Alan Mollohan, Chair; Frank Wolf, Ranking)
    • Defense (Norman Dicks, Chair; C.W. Bill Young, Ranking)
    • Energy and Water Development (Pete Visclosky, Chair; Rodney Frelinghuysen, Ranking)
    • Financial Services and General Government (Jos Serrano, Chair; Jo Ann Emerson, Ranking)
    • Homeland Security (David E. Price, Chair; Hal Rogers, Ranking)
    • Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies (Jim Moran, Chair; Mike Simpson, Ranking)
    • Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (David Obey, Chair; Todd Tiahrt, Ranking)
    • Legislative Branch (Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Chair; Robert Aderholt, Ranking)
    • Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies (Chet Edwards, Chair; Zach Wamp, Ranking)
    • State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs (Nita Lowey, Chair; Kay Granger, Ranking)
    • Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies (John Olver, Chair; Tom Latham, Ranking)
  • Armed Services (Ike Skelton, Chair; Buck McKeon, Ranking)
    • Readiness (Solomon P. Ortiz, Chair; Randy Forbes, Ranking)
    • Seapower and Expeditionary Forces (Gene Taylor, Chair; Todd Akin, Ranking)
    • Air and Land Forces (Neil Abercrombie, Chair; Roscoe Bartlett, Ranking)
    • Oversight and Investigations (Vic Snyder, Chair; Rob Wittman, Ranking)
    • Military Personnel (Susan A. Davis, Chair; U.S. politician)|Joe Wilson]], Ranking)
    • Terrorism and Unconventional Threats (Adam Smith, Chair; Jeff Miller, Ranking)
    • Strategic Forces (Jim Langevin, Chair; Mike Turner, Ranking)
  • Budget (John Spratt, Chair; politician)|Paul Ryan]], Ranking)
  • Education and Labor (George Miller, Chair; politician)|John Kline]], Ranking)
    • Early Childhood, Elementary and Secondary Education (Dale Kildee, Chair; Michael N. Castle, Ranking)
    • Healthy Families and Communities (Carolyn McCarthy, Chair; Todd Platts, Ranking)
    • Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions (Robert E. Andrews, Chair; U.S. politician)|Tom Price]], Ranking)
    • Higher Education, Lifelong Learning, and Competitiveness (Rub n Hinojosa, Chair; Brett Guthrie, Ranking)
    • Workforce Protections (Lynn C. Woolsey, Chair; Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Ranking)
  • Energy and Commerce (Henry Waxman, Chair; Joe Barton, Ranking)
    • Health (Frank Pallone, Chair; Nathan Deal, Ranking)
    • Energy and Environment (Ed Markey, Chair; Fred Upton, Ranking)
    • Commerce, Trade and Consumer Protection (Bobby Rush, Chair; George Radanovich, Ranking)
    • Communications, Technology and the Internet (Rick Boucher, Chair; Cliff Stearns, Ranking)
    • Oversight and Investigations (Bart Stupak, Chair; Greg Walden, Ranking)
  • Energy Independence and Global Warming (Select)[69][70] (Ed Markey, Chair; James Sensenbrenner, Ranking)
  • Financial Services (Barney Frank, Chair; Spencer Bachus, Ranking)
    • Domestic Monetary Policy and Technology (Mel Watt, Chair; Ron Paul, Ranking)
    • Oversight and Investigations (Mel Watt, Chair; Judy Biggert, Ranking)
    • International Monetary Policy and Trade (Gregory Meeks, Chair; Gary Miller, Ranking)
    • Housing and Community Opportunity (Maxine Waters, Chair; Shelley Moore Capito, Ranking)
    • Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit (Luis Gutierrez, Chair; Jeb Hensarling, Ranking)
    • Capital Markets, Insurance, and Government-Sponsored Enterprises (Paul Kanjorski, Chair; Scott Garrett, Ranking)
  • Foreign Affairs (Howard Berman, Chair; Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, Ranking)
    • Africa and Global Health (Donald M. Payne, Chair; Chris Smith, Ranking)
    • Asia, the Pacific, and the Global Environment (Eni Faleomavaega, Chair; Donald A. Manzullo, Ranking)
    • Europe (Robert Wexler, Chair; Elton Gallegly, Ranking)
    • International Organizations, Human Rights, and Oversight (Bill Delahunt, Chair; Dana Rohrabacher, Ranking)
    • Middle East and South Asia (Gary Ackerman, Chair; Mike Pence, Ranking)
    • Terrorism, Nonproliferation, and Trade (Brad Sherman, Chair; Ed Royce, Ranking)
    • Western Hemisphere (Eliot L. Engel, Chair; Dan Burton, Ranking)
  • Homeland Security (Bennie Thompson, Chair; Peter T. King, Ranking)
    • Border, Maritime and Global Counterterrorism (Loretta Sanchez, Chair; Mark Souder, Ranking)
    • Emergency Communications, Preparedness, and Response (Henry Cuellar, Chair; Charlie Dent, Ranking)
    • Emerging Threats, Cybersecurity, and Science and Technology (James Langevin, Chair; Michael McCaul, Ranking)
    • Intelligence, Information Sharing, and Terrorism Risk Assessment (Jane Harman, Chair; Dave Reichert, Ranking)
    • Management, Investigations, and Oversight (Chris Carney, Chair; Mike D. Rogers, Ranking)
    • Transportation Security and Infrastructure Protection (Sheila Jackson-Lee, Chair; Dan Lungren, Ranking)
  • House Administration (Bob Brady, Chair; Dan Lungren, Ranking)
    • Capitol Security (Bob Brady, Chair; Dan Lungren, Ranking)
    • Elections (Zoe Lofgren, Chair; California politician)|Kevin McCarthy]], Ranking)
  • Intelligence (Permanent Select) (Silvestre Reyes, Chair; Peter Hoekstra, Ranking)
    • Terrorism/HUMINT, Analysis and Counterintelligence (Mike Thompson, Chair; Mike Rogers, Ranking)
    • Technical and Tactical Intelligence (C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, Chair;, Ranking)
    • Intelligence Community Management (Anna Eshoo, Chair; Darrell Issa, Ranking)
    • Oversight and Investigations (Robert E. Cramer, Chair; Terry Everett, Ranking)
  • Judiciary (John Conyers, Chair; Lamar S. Smith, Ranking)
    • Commercial and Administrative Law (Linda T. S nchez, Chair; Trent Franks, Ranking)
    • Constitution, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties (Jerrold Nadler, Chair; James Sensenbrenner, Ranking)
    • Courts, the Internet, and Intellectual Property (Howard Berman, Chair; Howard Coble, Ranking)
    • Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security (Robert C. Scott, Chair; Louie Gohmert, Ranking)
    • Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security, and International Law (Zoe Lofgren, Chair; Steve King, Ranking)
  • Natural Resources (Nick Rahall, Chair; Doc Hastings, Ranking)
    • Energy and Mineral Resources (Jim Costa, Chair; Doug Lamborn, Ranking)
    • Insular Affairs, Oceans and Wildlife (Madeleine Bordallo, Chair; Henry Brown, Ranking)
    • National Parks, Forests and Public Lands (Ra l Grijalva, Chair; Rob Bishop, Ranking)
    • Water and Power (Grace Napolitano, Chair; Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Ranking)
  • Oversight and Government Reform (Edolphus Towns, Chair; Darrell Issa, Ranking)
    • Domestic Policy (Dennis Kucinich, Chair; Jason Chaffetz, Ranking)
    • Federal Workforce, Post Office, and District of Columbia (Stephen Lynch, Chair; Kenny Marchant, Ranking)
    • Government Management, Organization, and Procurement (Diane Watson, Chair; Brian Bilbray, Ranking)
    • Information Policy, Census, and National Archives (William Lacy Clay, Chair; Michael Turner, Ranking)
    • National Security and Foreign Affairs (John F. Tierney, Chair; , Ranking)
  • Rules (Louise Slaughter, Chair; David Dreier, Ranking)
    • Legislative and Budget Process (Alcee Hastings, Chair; Lincoln Diaz-Balart, Ranking)
    • Rules and the Organization of the House (Jim McGovern, Chair; Doc Hastings, Ranking)
  • Science and Technology (Bart Gordon, Chair; Ralph Hall, Ranking)
    • Space and Aeronautics (Gabrielle Giffords, Chair; Pete Olson, Ranking)
    • Technology and Innovation (David Wu, Chair; Adrian Smith, Ranking)
    • Research and Science Education (Daniel Lipinski, Chair; Vern Ehlers, Ranking)
    • Investigations and Oversight (Brad Miller, Chair; Paul Broun, Ranking)
    • Energy and Environment (Brian Baird, Chair; Bob Inglis, Ranking)
  • Small Business (Nydia Velazquez, Chair; Sam Graves, Ranking)
    • Finance and Tax (Melissa Bean, Chair; Dean Heller, Ranking)
    • Contracting and Technology (Glenn Nye, Chair; Aaron Schock, Ranking)
    • Rural and Urban Entrepreneurship (Heath Shuler, Chair; Jeff Fortenberry, Ranking)
    • Regulations, Healthcare and Trade (Kathy Dahlkemper, Chair; Lynn Westmoreland, Ranking)
    • Investigations and Oversight (Jason Altmire, Chair; Louie Gohmert, Ranking)
  • Standards of Official Conduct (Zoe Lofgren, Chair; Jo Bonner, Ranking)
  • Transportation and Infrastructure (James Oberstar, Chair; John Mica, Ranking)
    • Aviation (Jerry Costello, Chair; Thomas Petri, Ranking)
    • Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation (Elijah Cummings, Chair; Frank LoBiondo, Ranking)
    • Economic Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management (Eleanor Holmes Norton, Chair; Sam Graves, Ranking)
    • Highways and Transit (Peter DeFazio, Chair; John J. Duncan, Jr., Ranking)
    • Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials (Corrine Brown, Chair; Bill Shuster, Ranking)
    • Water Resources and Environment (Eddie Bernice Johnson, Chair; John Duncan, Jr., Ranking)
  • Veterans' Affairs (Bob Filner, Chair; Steve Buyer, Ranking)
    • Disability Assistance and Memorial Affairs (John Hall, Chair; Doug Lamborn, Ranking)
    • Economic Opportunity (Stephanie Herseth Sandlin, Chair; John Boozman, Ranking)
    • Health (Michael Michaud, Chair; Jeff Miller, Ranking)
    • Oversight and Investigations (Harry Mitchell, Chair; Ginny Brown-Waite, Ranking)
  • Ways and Means (Sander Levin, from March 4, 2010 (acting; Dave Camp, Ranking)
    • Health (Pete Stark, Chair; Wally Herger, Ranking)
    • Social Security (John S. Tanner, Chair; Sam Johnson, Ranking)
    • Income Security and Family Support (Jim McDermott, Chair; John Linder, Ranking)
    • Trade (Sander Levin, Chair; Kevin Brady, Ranking)
    • Oversight (John Lewis, Chair; Charles Boustany, Ranking)
    • Select Revenue Measures (Richard Neal, Chair; Pat Tiberi, Ranking)

Joint appointments

  • Economic (Rep. Carolyn Maloney, Chair; Sen. Sam Brownback, Ranking)
  • The Library (Rep. Zoe Lofgren, Chair; Sen. Bob Bennett, Ranking)
  • Printing, (Rep. Bob Brady, Chair; Rep. Dan Lungren, Ranking)
  • Joint Committee on Taxation (Sen. Max Baucus, Chair; Sen. Chuck Grassley, Ranking)

Employees

  • Architect of the Capitol: Stephen T. Ayers
  • Attending Physician of the United States Congress: Brian Monahan

Senate

  • Chaplain: Barry C. Black
  • Curator: Diane K. Skvarla
  • Historian: Richard A. Baker
  • Parliamentarian: Alan Frumin
  • Secretary: Nancy Erickson
  • Sergeant at Arms: Terrance W. Gainer
  • Secretary for the Majority: Lula J. Davis
  • Secretary for the Minority: David J. Schiappa

House of Representatives

  • Chaplain: Daniel P. Coughlin
  • Chief Administrative Officer: Daniel P. Beard, until July 1, 2010[71]
    • Daniel Strodel, from July 18, 2010[72]
  • Clerk: Lorraine Miller
  • Historian: Robert Remini
    • Matthew Wasniewski, from October 20, 2010[73]
  • Parliamentarian: John V. Sullivan
  • Reading Clerks: Jaime Zapata, Susan Cole
  • Sergeant at Arms: Wilson Bill Livingood
  • Inspector General: James J. Cornell,[74] until January 2, 2010[75]
    • Theresa M. Grafenstine, from July 30, 2010[76]
  • See also: Rules of the House: "Other officers and officials"

See also

Elections

  • United States congressional elections, 2008 (elections held in advance of this Congress)
    • United States Senate elections, 2008
    • United States House of Representatives elections, 2008
  • United States congressional elections, 2010 (elections held during this Congress)
    • United States Senate elections, 2010
    • United States House of Representatives elections, 2010

Membership lists

  • Members of the 111th United States Congress
  • List of freshman class members of the 111th United States Congress
  • List of current United States Senators by age and generation
  • List of current United States Senators by age
  • List of current United States Representatives by age and generation
  • House trade working group

References

External links

de:111. Kongress der Vereinigten Staaten es:111. Congreso de los Estados Unidos fr:111e Congr s des tats-Unis it:111 Congresso degli Stati Uniti nl:111e Amerikaans Congres ja: 111 pl:111. Kongres Stan w Zjednoczonych pt:111 Congresso dos Estados Unidos ro:Al 111-lea Congres al Statelor Unite ale Americii






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